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Pea, Oregon Sugar Pod II

Short Description

Produces a huge crop of snow peas with high percentage of two pods per cluster.

Full Description

As versatile as snap peas-pick snow peas flat and tender. Vigorous 28" plants bear 4 1/2" long pods. Resistant to pea virus, common wilt and powdery mildew. Superb for freezing. Direct-sow in early spring, again in midsummer for a fall crop. Outstanding winter crop in Zones 9-11. 200-225 seeds per packet; sows about 30' of row. Proven tops for performance, flavor and wide adaptability. Our seeds are not treated.
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Item#: 53744A
Order: 1 Pkt. (300 seeds)
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$3.95
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Item#: 53744T
Order: 1 Pkt. (900 seeds)
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$9.95
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Product properties

Days To Maturity

68 days

Fruit Size

4 inches

Sun

Full Sun

Spread

8 inches

Height

28 inches

Sow Method

Direct Sow

Planting Time

Fall, Spring

Sow Time

2-4 weeks BLF

Thin

6 inches

Life Cycle

Annual

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  • How to Sow

    • Because peas are members of the legume family of plants, they can benefit from an application of a soil inoculant designed for beans and peas, prior to planting. The inoculant will enable the plants to take nitrogen from the air to use as fertilizer, which can increase crop yield and quality.
    • For optimum flavor, grow in cool weather.
    • Coat untreated seed with an inoculant.
    • Sow in average soil in full sun in early spring for first crop, in late summer for fall crop.
    • Support shorter peas on small stakes or a pea fence. Taller peas can be supported with a tower or trellis netting. Set supports for vining varieties prior to planting.
    • In rows 2 inches apart in double rows spaced 6 inches apart with 24 inches between each set of rows.
    • Cover with 1 inch of fine soil, and sow 1 inch deep.
    • Thin gradually to stand 4-6 inches apart starting when seedlings are about 1-2 inches high.

    How to Grow

    • Protect spring plantings with floating row covers to keep flea beetles away.
    • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating. Avoid disturbing the soil around the plants when weeding.
    • Keep plants well watered during dry periods to promote rapid, uninterrupted growth. They do not perform well in overly wet conditions. Seeds can rot in wet soil before germination occurs when planted in early spring.
    • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.

    Harvest and Preserving Tips

    • To determine when to pick shell peas, check the pods by eye and feel. If the pea pod is round, has a nice sheen, and is bright green, it is ready. If the seeds have made ridges on the pod and the pods are dull green, it is past prime.
    • You can pick snap and snow peas at any time but are tastiest when the pods still have some play around the peas when you squeeze the pods.
    • Pick snow peas before the peas start to enlarge.
    • If harvest exceeds immediate fresh use, you can freeze peas immediately after harvest to retain rich flavor. Blanch peas for two minutes in boiling water, drain, and then plunge into ice cold water for another two minutes. Drain again and loosely pack the peas into plastic freezer bags or containers. Use within 9 months for best quality.
    • Peas can also be dried in a dehydrator and stored in a sealed canister for use in soups and stews.
  • Days To Maturity
    68 days
    Fruit Size
    4 inches
    Sun
    Full Sun
    Spread
    8 inches
    Height
    28 inches
    Sow Method
    Direct Sow
    Planting Time
    Fall, Spring
    Sow Time
    2-4 weeks BLF
    Thin
    6 inches
    Life Cycle
    Annual
  • Pea, Oregon Sugar Pod II is rated 4.7273 out of 5 by 11.
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from This is an absolutely must in my Fall/Winter/Spring garden box in Arizona. I have a trellis in my 4' x 2' Monarch Garden Box and plant the first crop by last week in Sept. As long as nights stay above 50 degrees I inter-plant to extend the crop well into December/January. I will re-seed again after our last frost in Mid-February. Oregon Sugar Pod is my most reliable and heavy yield treat from the garden!
    Date published: 2015-11-09
    Rated 3 out of 5 by from Normally a great snowpea This year was not a success for my snowpeas. I've grown these for several years with great success, but unfortunately not this year. I haven't figured out why yet: the peas only lasted part of the growing season, produce a miniscule number of pods, and I had to pull them out early. Very sad. But I do recommend these in general and will plant them again next year. Hopefully will know by then what happened this year!
    Date published: 2013-09-02
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Surprisingly Hardy I planted these in a container in mid-March, they took quite some time to germinate and I thought our extra cold spring weather had killed them all. They sprouted eventually about a month and a half later & after that they were pretty much ignored for 6+ weeks (medical issues kept me out of the garden during that time). We had cold snap after cold snap & I was stunned when these stunted little vines began to produce! Only a handful of small pods altogether off of four vines, but they were delicious. Some leaf miners got to them in the past few weeks and I was going to pull them up a few days ago but didn't get around to it. Today I go out and see seven new blooms! In spite of adversity they did remarkably well, in my opinion. I am eager to try them again next year when I can give them a more attention, hopefully more favorable weather and allow them live up to their full potential!
    Date published: 2013-07-19
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Oregon snow pea Have produced enormously for me this year. Planted late Dec 2011 - just (mid May) pulled the vines. Had them raw, blanched and froze some. Used less than half the envelope. Waiting for September
    Date published: 2012-05-09
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic pea Love this pea! If I can keep the chipmunks from digging up the seed the germination is great, and they don't require a lot of fussing over. They are crisp with a sweet, clean flavor. They are pretty forgiving too, I've grown them for the last 3 years with some less than ideal weather conditions and they still had great yields. Even if you haven't had luck with other peas give this one a try, just don't forget the innoculant- burpee makes a great one.
    Date published: 2010-07-19
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from My Workhorse like peas for fence or forgotten areas, they can just be planted & left. This one is perfect for that. It germinates well, grows quite rapidly & produces a lot of long pods which taste good & will freeze well. This is the pea which is planted every year in these gardens.
    Date published: 2010-05-27
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from productive, tasty, easy I have planted this variety 2 years in a row, and though my pods don't usually look picture perfect, they taste delicious, and are the only pea I've tried that seems to thrive in my poor soil, three varieties of shelling peas have failed miserably. Had to plant twice because the chipmunks loved the seed, but my second planting quickly caught up, and they produced until August- we did have a cool summer. The really nice thing about this pea is that even if the seed starts to develop a little more than ideal if you miss a pod, they are still tender enough to eat, and very sweet tasting. They also keep several days in the refrigerator for me.
    Date published: 2009-09-12
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sweet and Delicious I planted my first garden last year. These pea pods were among the most rewarding and no-fuss things that I planted.
    Date published: 2008-03-19
    • 2016-02-11T06:02CST
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