Ask a Gardener

Ask a Gardener

Burpee's Garden Forum is a unique hub for the garden community, a one-step-shop to get your questions answered from fellow gardeners!

Can you plant type op corn with other types

Asked by: Mikel53
Yes, except for supersweet or sh2 varieties, which are best isolated from all other varieties.
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

Gardening S.O.S.!!!! I am the new owner of a beautiful very neglected garden. I have what I believe are a bed iris that are pushing the roots/bulbs out of the ground can I divide and thin them out now or should I wait?

Asked by: KansasGardenNewbie
Dividing them now is ok, or it would be better to wait until fall after they go dormant. Be sure to mulch them well for the winter after transplanting. Good luck.
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

I purchased the "Tomato Super Sweet 100 Hybrid", can I plant the seeds in a hanging flower pot until ripe?

Asked by: Brenda2
Certainly, but only one plant per hanging pot would be best.
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

my bush beans are about 6-8 inches tall now with their first set of leaves and the second set starting to come out, it seams when I put my bush beans in the full sun leaves stand straight up like reaching for sky, lay back down in shade.

Asked by: My name is Michael
That is normal for beans. Don't worry about it. Good luck
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

I have bushes I have cut down and the stumps remain. I need the stumps out. I can't use a vehicle to yank them out. I don't want to use poison because of my dogs. I have dug and trimmed the roots and still no luck. Advice please???

Asked by: Calamity02
If the stumps are still alive, then I recommend drilling a good sized hole into them and filling the hole with concentrated Roundup, which is safe in my opinion when used as directed and biodegrades rapidly to harmless substances. If the stumps are dead, then drilling a good sized hole into them and filling the hole with Potassium Nitrate, available at my local home center as a product called Stump Away or something similar, will cause them to rot away quickly. If you don't want to use chemicals, then you could apply some high nitrogen fertilizer such as blood meal or cotton seed meal, and then cover them with black plastic for a year or two and that should take care of them. Good luck.
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

How do I keep squirrels and groundhogs from eating the vegetables in my garden?

Asked by: Queen
A good fence, with extra fortification down below to prevent burrowing under, and an electrified wire running along the top is what I use. I have a real problem with racoons destroying my corn just before harvest time, and an electrified fence is the only effective remedy, in my experience. Good luck
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

I planted seeds, mostly tomato, in the burpee self watering system tray. I also have the burpee grow lights and stand. My plants became exceptionally leggy and the stems are breaking in half. What did I do incorrectly? Can any of the plants be salvaged?

Asked by: dccat
The most common cause of weak, leggy seedlings is inadequate light. Contrary to what others may tell you, I leave my grow lights on 24 hours/day, which will not harm your plants. Tomato seedlings in particular will toughen up if they get "tickled" periodically to mimic the wind. I blow on mine every time I look at them to accomplish this purpose. Finally, adequate nutrition is necessary. I add a 1/2 teaspoon of soluable plant fertilizer per gallon of their water, and I use rain water or distilled water in order to prevent salt buildup in the growing media. So what to do now? I would transplant them immediately to larger quarters, such as plastic cups with a hole punched into the bottom for drainage. Tomatoes do not like soggy, water logged media to grow in. And I would plant them deeply in their new quarters, as new roots will grow from their stems that are below ground level. Raising the temperature, and/or the light level, will also help. Good luck.
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18

Have you heard of egg shell and vinegar mixture to help with blossom end rot? Does it work? What would the mixture be? Thanks.

Asked by: Machaboc
Blossom-end-rot disease is a problem that is thought to be due to a Calcium deficiency in the soil. I always include some bone meal and occasionally some crushed limestone when I plant my tomatoes. Egg shells are made of Calcium carbonate, and should be an excellent addition to your tomato beds as a Calcium supplement. Vinegar is ~ 5% acetic acid, and will react with egg shells to form Calcium acetate, which should be a very excellent bioavailable source of Calcium. While I have never done this myself, I think I would react the egg shells completely in a goodly amount of vinegar, and then dilute the resulting mixture in a gallon or more of water, before providing it to my tomato plants. I have also heard that watering your tomato plants with skim milk can also prevent or lessen blossom-end-rot. Good luck
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-05-18
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