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All About Swiss Chard

Chard is a close relative of beets. It is often grown as a summer substitute for spinach because of its tolerance for warm temperatures.
It also withstands cool temperatures and can be grown from early spring right up to frost.
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CAN I GROW SWISS CHARD?


Swiss chard prefers rich, well-drained soil in full sun or light shade. In the North, sow from early spring to midsummer for a fall crop; in the South sow in fall to spring. Sow the seeds 1/2 inch deep in rows spaced 18 inches apart. Thin seedlings to 12 inches apart when they are large enough to handle.
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INSECTS & DISEASES

Plants are rarely bothered by pests and diseases and grow easily.

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HARVEST TIPS


Use thinnings as salad greens. Harvest outer leaves as needed, when they are more than 6 inches long. Cut the leaves about 1 inch from the ground.  Harvest continually to keep the plants productive.

Hint:
Before the first hard freeze in fall, dig up the plants with the roots still attached, and with some soil covering the roots. If you store the plants where it is cool and moist you can keep harvesting from them during the winter.

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RECIPES & STORAGE

Use as a green, either cooked or raw. Use the leafstalks with the leaves, or cook the stalks separately like asparagus.
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See all our swiss chard

Read the next Article: Asparagus

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • If you received a flowering amaryllis plant for the holidays, you can make it bloom again next year around the holiday time.

    After the flowers fade, cut just the flower stalk to about 2 inches above the soil level. Continue watering when soil becomes dry. Regularly fertilize the plant with a houseplant formula such as 5-5-5 or 5-10-5 following directions on the fertilizer package. After about six months of allowing the foliage to grow, stop fertilizing and begin to reduce watering over a 2- to 3-week period. After this period, stop watering. Eliminating water and fertilizer allows the bulb to enter a dormant or resting phase. Move the pot to a dry, cool (50 to 60 degrees F.) room that has good ventilation for 2 to 3 months.

    Sometime in early November, move the pot to a bright, warm spot and renew watering. In anywhere from 4 to 8 weeks, the amaryllis should flower again.