top
 Shop all our Mother's Day Gifts
asd

Fall Radishes

Gardeners eager to get their first seeds in the ground in spring often sow a quick crop of radishes, which grow quickly and can be harvested in a matter of weeks. Radishes are a terrific fall crop, too — they’re traditional fare for Octoberfest.

Radishes are grown mainly for their roots, which are most often round but can be as long as a carrot or as fat as a beet. Japanese radishes, often called Daikon radishes, have white roots up to 14 inches long. Grocery stores seldom venture beyond round red radishes and stick-straight Daikons, but there is lots of variety in the radish family: ‘Black Spanish’ radish, an heirloom variety, has dark skin and snow-white flesh; ‘Watermelon’ has round, white roots and a burst of crimson inside. ‘Salad Rose’ is a deep pink radish about the size and shape of a small carrot and great for fall gardens: it is known as a beer radish.

In German beer gardens, long radishes are sliced with a special tool (cooking shops sell them) that makes radish spirals, which are served as a snack with pretzels or as a garnish on a plate with roasted meats. For a snack to go with a frosty mug of beer, you might be served a radish salad or a few bright red round radishes, sliced and sprinkled with cracked pepper and chives.

Octoberfest actually starts in September and lasts for a couple of weeks. If you’re holding your own fest, radishes are accommodating: they keep well in a crisper. They’re delicious no matter how you serve them: crisp and peppery in a salad, sliced thin on a sandwich, or roasted, stir-fried, pickled, or preserved.

All radishes produce abundant greens, which can be sauteed or tossed in salads. They are especially tasty when they’re young. Like radishes themselves, leafy radish tops are often spicy, a bit like mustard greens. Serve with a little polka music on the side.

Read the next Article: Cucumber & Squash A-Frame Supports

Personalize Your Site:

Enter your zip code to:

  • Find your growing zone.
  • See best products for your region.
  • Show accurate product shipping dates.
Go
Clear my Zip Code

Gardening Tip of the Day

  • New gardeners can’t go wrong with annual flowers. Planted in average soil and deeply watered once a week, annuals will provide a summer’s worth of wonderful blooms. Started from seed or set out as transplants, these winners will really perform if a few inches of compost are worked into the soil before planting.

    Try wax-leaf begonia in partial shade. Cleome is perfect for the background where it gets full sun. Impatiens is wonderful in the shade. Lantana loves hot weather with flowers from yellow to orange to lavender. Torenia, or wishbone flower, is a relatively new ""toughie."" It grows best in partial shade loves heat. Zinnias are tough sun lovers that really put on a show in a variety of colors.