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Bunching Onion, Evergreen Long White

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Short Description

Long, slender, tasty stalks in clusters with spring green ends.

Full Description

Grow in full sun to partial shade. If planted in the fall, provide protection where winters are severe. Harvest young plants in 60 days or up to 120 days for mature plants. HOW TO GROW ONIONS FROM SEED: For best results, sow seeds indoors 8-10 weeks before last heavy frost. Start on a sunny windowsill or under plant lights. Plant out in the garden and space seedlings 2-3" apart. Alternatively, sow directly in the garden in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked and then again in fall.
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Item#: 60723A
Order: 1 Pkt. (2000 seeds)
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Product properties

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

120 days

Fruit Size The average size of the fruit produced by this product.

1 inches

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

4 inches

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

10-12 inches

Sow Method This refers to whether the seed should be sown early indoors and the seedlings transplanted outside later, or if the seed should be sown directly in the garden at the recommended planting time.

Direct Sow

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Organic Gardening Basics
Organic gardening means growing using all natural methods. We explain the basics to get you started.
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How to Sow and Plant

Onions may be grown from seed, from young bare root plants or from sets (small bulbs). Make sure to choose the correct variety for your day length. Southern gardeners should select Short Day varieties; Northern gardeners do best with Long Day varieties; gardeners in the middle of the country should select Intermediate Day varieties, but can use some Short Day varieties.

Sowing Seed Indoors

  • Onion seed may be started indoors in small flats in seed starting mix 6-10 weeks before the last frost.
  • Sow thinly and cover with ¼ inch of seed starting formula. Keep moist and maintain a temperature of about 60-65 degrees F.
  • Seedlings emerge in 7-14 days.
  • As soon as seedlings emerge, provide plenty of light on a sunny windowsill or grow seedlings 3-4 inches beneath fluorescent plant lights turned on 16 hours per day, off for 8 hours at night. Raise the lights as the plants grow. Incandescent bulbs do not work because they get too hot. Most plants require a dark period to grow, do not leave lights on for 24 hours.
  • Seedlings do not need much fertilizer, feed when they are 3-4 weeks old using a starter solution (half strength of a complete indoor houseplant food) according to manufacturer’s directions.
  • After danger of a heavy frost plant the seedlings in the garden when they are about the thickness of a pencil. Before planting in the garden, seedling plants need to be “hardened off”. Accustom young plants to outdoor conditions by moving them to a sheltered place outside for a week. Be sure to protect them from wind and hot sun at first. If frost threatens at night, cover or bring containers indoors, then take them out again in the morning. This hardening off process toughens cell structure and reduces transplant shock and sun burn.
  • Space 3-4 inches apart in rows 1-2 feet apart. Plant more closely if you plan to harvest scallions.

Soil Preparation in the Garden

  • Choose a location in full sun where you did not plant onions the previous year.
  • Apply a balanced fertilizer and work into the soil prior to planting. Onions prefer a pH of 6.0 – 7.0.
  • Onions prefer an organic soil that drains well. Work organic matter into your soil at least 6-8 inches deep, removing stones, then level and smooth.

Sowing Directly in the Garden

  • Sow onion seeds in average soil in full sun after danger of frost in spring. In frost free areas, sow in fall.
  • Sow thinly in rows 1- 2 feet apart and cover with ¼ inch of fine soil. Firm lightly and keep evenly moist.
  • Seedlings emerge in 7-14 days.
  • Thin to stand about 3 inches apart when seedlings are 1- 2 inches high.

From Plants

  • Burpee ships small onion plants about 10 to 12 weeks old in early spring. Plant onion plants as soon as possible after you receive them, as soon as the soil can be worked, before the last frost.
  • Plant onion plants 1 inch deep, 5 – 6 inches apart, or 2 – 3 inches if you prefer to thin later for green onions or scallions. Water well.

From Sets

  • Just press sets into the soil up to their tops, barely covered with soil 3-4 inches apart in rows 1-2 feet apart. If sets are planted too deeply they will take longer to develop.

How to Grow

  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating.
  • Ample water is important at all stages of growth, especially when bulbs are forming. Onions are shallow rooted and tend to dry out during periods of drought. The best method to water is by ditch or furrow irrigation. This provides water to the roots while keeping the tops dry. If the tops are regularly wet they are more susceptible to disease.
  • Onions are heavy feeders, side dress with fertilizer about six weeks after planting.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.

Harvest and Preserving Tips

  • Pick green onions (scallions) when plants reach 6-8" tall, while the stalks are still white at the bottom and fairly thin.
  • When harvesting onion bulbs, about 100 days from sowing, bend the tops over when about ¼ of the tops have already fallen over and turned yellow. After a few days, pull the bulbs and cover them with the foliage to prevent sunburn.
  • Allow onions to dry in the garden for up to a week, then cure them indoors in a warm, dry place with good air circulation for 2-3 weeks. Then cut off the foliage, leaving 1" above the top of the bulb.
  • Clean the bulbs by removing dirt and any of the papery skin that comes loose when you handle them.
  • Put bulbs in mesh onion bags or old pantyhose and store in a cool, dry location. Check occasionally for any wet spots or mold and remove any damaged bulbs immediately to protect the rest.
  • All onions lose their pungency when cooked. To neutralize the flavor, sauté, parboil or microwave the onions briefly before adding to your recipe.
  • To minimize the discomfort of onion tears while chopping onions, work fast (but carefully!) and work closely to the kitchen fan. You can also use a food processor.
  • Besides fresh storage, small onions may be canned by the hot pack method.
  • Chopped, sliced or grated onions may be quickly dried in a food dehydrator and stored in air-tight containers on the pantry shelf.
  • Small whole onions may also be pickled, while larger ones may be used in mixed pickles or to flavor cucumber or tomato pickles.
Days To Maturity
120 days
Fruit Size
1 inches
Full Sun
4 inches
10-12 inches
Sow Method
Direct Sow
Planting Time
Sow Time
2-4 weeks BLF
4 inches
Life Cycle
Bunching Onion, Evergreen Long White is rated 5.0 out of 5 by 7.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sow What?! I think direct sow is always a bit of a gamble but did that with these and had no problem at all. I read these are companions to potatoes so made a border of these around my Yukon Golds/Reds and was very pleased at how well they did. You can't beat the freshness either. Thinning will give you thicker bases but I didn't find any real drawbacks in either production or taste with several that grew more densely, aside from a more slender base. I grew some separately in Smart Pots also with good results. (Image has scallions with pickles, zucchini and cucumber friends)
Date published: 2014-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Like there! These onions are a wonderful addition to our salads. And I've came up with a new way to grow them. Our little vegetable garden is outlined with a brick perimeter about 4" high. I plant these onions about 2" from the brick in an area where no larger plant would grow. Each time we go out to pull some we take about 6 seeds from our storage spot in the refrigerator. We drop a seed in each place where an onion is pulled. Result: an continuing harvest of varying maturity and no crowding. Next year I'll start the onions next to another row of brick to reduce chance of overwintering disease (although these onions never show any sign of disease.) I am doing the same thing with radishes.
Date published: 2011-04-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Performers and Great Tasting Scallions I saw the seed packets in a store last year and thought I'd give it a try. I'm certainly glad that I did! It was probably about the middle of the summer growing season here in the Northeast and I planted the seeds directly in some large barrels I used as pots. I think every seed germinated (I did the scatter method :) ) and I had a fantastic yield right up to the first light frost. I had been cutting some and completely reaping others as the summer went along. At the light frost, I pulled up about 1/2 of the remaining ones and cut the rest at the base. After rinsing them and allowing them to air dry, I've stored them in the freezer and have been using them all winter long. The flavor is fantastic fresh from the garden or from the winter store. It takes very little space to grow and gives fantastic yield. As others have mentioned, for larger scallions, thin them out (and definitely use the ones that you pull). This is definitely becoming a part of my yearly order. I'll see how well they return year after year.
Date published: 2011-01-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Best These are wonderful! They come back every year (if you don't eat them all the first year). In fact, they took over one end of the garden.
Date published: 2010-03-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Good taste Good flavor. Grew them from seed and they all took very well. Planted them all too close together and didn't thin them out so most were a bit smaller, but still good tasting and great to cook with.
Date published: 2009-09-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Great Great I LOVE these onions! I have planted them three times this planting season already and have had great results. I have to keep replanting because I use these onions almost everyday. They're great because once you pull up the mature onions, you can replant more seeds right away to extend the harvest. Very low maintenance and high yield. I will definatly plant these again next year!
Date published: 2007-07-04
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