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Leek, Dawn Giant

Short Description

The first easy-to-grow leek! This leek is huge.

Full Description

This leek is huge, up to 15" long and 2" across, but what really makes it special is how extraordinarily early it is to grow. You can forget about the hassle of starting the seed indoors. Just sow the seeds directly in the ground in early spring, and you'll be pulling long succulent stems by midsummer on into fall. One packet will plant 18' of row.
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Item#: 63388A
Order: 1 Pkt. (500 seeds)
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$3.95
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Product properties

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

98 days

Fruit Size The average size of the fruit produced by this product.

15 inches

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

12 inches

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

24 inches

Sow Method This refers to whether the seed should be sown early indoors and the seedlings transplanted outside later, or if the seed should be sown directly in the garden at the recommended planting time.

Direct Sow

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Video

How To Direct Sow Seeds
Learn how to direct sow seeds from Burpee's expert horticulturist.
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Growing Leeks
Leeks are closely related to onions but have a sweeter, creamier, more delicate flavor. Prized by cooks as a flavoring for dishes of all types.
Watch video

How to Sow

  • Sow in early to late spring for a fall crop. In the Deep South, Gulf and Pacific Coast areas, sow from fall to early spring.
  • Choose a location with loose, well-drained soil in full sun where you did not plant members of the onion family the previous year.
  • Work organic matter into your soil at least 6-8 inches deep, removing stones, then level and smooth.
  • Sow seeds ¼ inch deep in rows 18 inches apart.
  • Firm lightly and keep evenly moist.
  • Seeds emerge in 14-21 days.
  • Thin to 6 inches apart when seedlings are 1-2 inches high.

How to Grow

  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating. Avoid disturbing the soil around the plants when weeding.
  • Keep plants well watered during dry periods to promote rapid, uninterrupted growth. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. It’s best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
  • When the plants are about the size of a pencil, wrap the base of the stalks with paper or mound up the soil to blanch them.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.

Harvest and Preserving Tips

  • Harvest leeks when the bases of the stalks reach ¾-2 inches in diameter, about 90 days after sowing.
  • Sever the roots under the stalks and twist the stalks back and forth to loosen them and ease them out of the ground. Cut off remaining roots and all but 2 inches of the leaves.
  • Harvest as many leeks as you will use and leave the rest to harvest later in winter.
  • Mulch leeks heavily in cold winters.
  • Leeks may be frozen after blanching.

Common Disease Problems

Damping Off: This is one of the most common problems when starting plants from seed. The seedling emerges and appears healthy; then it suddenly wilts and dies for no obvious reason. Damping off is caused by a fungus that is active when there is abundant moisture and soils and air temperatures are above 68 degrees F. Typically, this indicates that the soil is too wet or contains high amounts of nitrogen fertilizer. Burpee Recommends: Keep seedlings moist but do not overwater; avoid over-fertilizing your seedlings; thin out seedlings to avoid overcrowding; make sure the plants are getting good air circulation; if you plant in containers, thoroughly wash them in soapy water and rinse in a ten per cent bleach solution after use.

Downy Mildew: This fungus causes whitish gray patches on the undersides and eventually both sides of the leaves. Burpee Recommends: Rotate crops with plants in a different family. Avoid overhead watering. Provide adequate air circulation, do not overcrowd plants. Do not work around plants when they are wet.

Onion White Rot: This soil-borne fungus causes yellowing and wilting of foliage above ground. Below ground, the roots rot and the fungus also infects the bulb. At the base of the bulb, a white fluffy fungus will appear with black fungal bodies. Burpee Recommends: Remove infected bulbs. Practice crop rotation with members of the onion family.

Pink Root Rot: A fungus that attacks roots causing them to turn a light pink, then red and eventually purple-brown and causing them to shrivel. Infected plants show signs of nutrient deficiencies and drought because the roots cannot take up water and nutrients. Plants are stunted. The disease lives in the soil for several years and thrives in warm temperatures. Burpee Recommends: Plant as early as possible so the bulk of the plant growth will be in cooler temperatures. Rotate crops and plant resistant varieties.

Rust: A number of fungus diseases that cause rust colored spots on foliage, stalks and husks. Burpee Recommends: Plant early as these diseases tend to be worse later in the season. Plant resistant varieties. Practice crop rotation. Remove infected plants.

Harvest and Preserving Tips

  • Harvest leeks when the bases of the stalks reach ¾-2 inches in diameter, about 90 days after sowing.
  • Sever the roots under the stalks and twist the stalks back and forth to loosen them and ease them out of the ground. Cut off remaining roots and all but 2 inches of the leaves.
  • Harvest as many leeks as you will use and leave the rest to harvest later in winter.
  • Mulch leeks heavily in cold winters.
  • Leeks may be frozen after blanching.
Days To Maturity
98 days
Fruit Size
15 inches
Sun
Full Sun
Spread
12 inches
Height
24 inches
Sow Method
Direct Sow
Planting Time
Spring
Sow Time
2-4 weeks BLF
Thin
8 inches
Life Cycle
Annual
Leek, Dawn Giant is rated 5.0 out of 5 by 2.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best Ever I've been growning these leeks for years in North Pole Alaska. They would get huge.I would start them in February. I see that they might be discontinued. Please do not remove this item from your catalog, It has been awesome.
Date published: 2009-02-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Leek This year was the first time I direct seeded leeks in my garden. I usually start them on a windowsill in late February and transplant them around early May. For a change, I decided to direct seed Burpee Dawn Giant leeks into my plot in early May and eventually thinned them to 8"-10" apart. By September, I was picking giant leeks of excellent quality. If you like leeks, you should try this variety.
Date published: 2007-12-23
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