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Garlic Gardening Guide

Each set (bulb) is made up of several sections called cloves, held together by a thin, papery covering. Before planting, break cloves apart.
Note: Elephant Garlic is shipped to you as individual cloves.


Fall planting:

Plant cloves in mid-autumn in a sunny location with rich, well-drained soil. Set cloves root side down 4–6" apart in rows 11/2–2' apart, and cover with 1–2" of fine soil. In the North, put down 6" of mulch for winter protection. Garlic may begin growth late in fall or early in spring.

Spring planting:

Plant cloves as early in spring as soil can be worked, about the same time as onion sets. Spring planted garlic should be put in the ground in the same manner as in the fall.

Harvesting and storage:

In late summer, bend over tops to hasten yellowing and drying of tops. Pull up the plants and allow to dry in the sun a few hours. Spread out in a well-ventilated place until tops are thoroughly dry (2–3 weeks). Cut tops off 1–2" above bulbs, or braid tops together into strings. Store loose bulbs in a dry, cool, airy place in baskets; hang garlic strings.

Click here to watch our video "How to Plant Garlic"

Read the next Article: Potatoes Gardening Guide

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • If the best looking melons in the garden had little or no flavor last summer, the problem may be the variety planted. Some melon types do better in a region than others and only trial and error or an experienced local gardener or county extension agent can guide you.

    Occasionally the problem is the soil. It may lack sufficient nutrients or the pH can be too low. Dig in compost or rotted manure before planting. Melons do best in neutral to slightly alkaline soil. Have your soil tested and if the pH is below 6.5, amend with lime. Sometimes a lot of rain near the time of harvest will dilute the sugar in melons affecting taste. Watermelons will regain their sugars if you hold off harvesting for a few days. Cantaloupes will not.