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Corn, On Deck Hybrid

Short Description

The first-ever sweet corn you can grow in a container.

Full Description

And now on deck sweet corn! Ever so tasty breakthrough bicolor variety is perfectly sized-4-5' tall-to spend the summer on your deck, patio, or terrace, adding vertical interest as well as producing two to three delicious 7-8" long ears per stalk. This first-ever container-ready corn is a revolution-one you can enjoy from the comfort of your patio. Simply plant 9 seeds per 24" container and get ready to harvest in about 2 months! Supersweet (Sh2). For best germination results, make sure that soil temperature is above 55 degrees Fahrenheit prior to planting.
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Item#: 61000A
Order: 1 Pkt. (50 seeds)
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$6.95
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Product properties

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

61-63 days

Fruit Size The average size of the fruit produced by this product.

7-8 inches

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

12-18 inches

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

48-60 inches

Sow Method This refers to whether the seed should be sown early indoors and the seedlings transplanted outside later, or if the seed should be sown directly in the garden at the recommended planting time.

Direct Sow

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Video

Growing Fresh Summer Corn
Eating fresh sweet corn is one of the greatest delights of summer. See how easy it is to grow your own.
Watch video
Chef Ian Knauer Recipe - Raw Corn Salad with Basil
Chef Ian Knauer of the Farm Cooking School in Stockton New Jersey Prepares Raw Summer Corn and Basil Salad.
Watch video

How to Sow

  • Growing corn is easy provided you have enough space and plenty of sun. Corn is wind-pollinated, so you need to plant in blocks to ensure pollination. You should have a minimum 10 foot by 10 foot area. The exception to this rule is ‘On Deck’ corn, which has been bred to grow in containers. If you are growing ‘On Deck’, choose a container that is at least 24 inches wide and deep and plant nine seeds evenly spaced.
  • Isolate corn varieties when recommended (Sh2s), by planting corn seeds at least 250 feet apart, or select varieties that mature at least 2 weeks apart so they will not cross pollinate.
  • When choosing a site for corn, plant on the north side of your garden so the tall plants do not shade other plants in your vegetable garden.
  • Corn is a warm season crop and should not be planted in cool soils. The non Sh2 varieties tend to be more tolerant of cool soils, but in general the soil should be about 65 degrees F or warmer.
  • Sow corn seed 1 inch deep, 5 to 6 inches apart in rows 2 to 3 feet apart.
  • Seedlings emerge in 7-14 days.
  • When corn seedlings are 3-5 inches tall and healthy, thin to 1 foot apart.

How to Grow

  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating.
  • Keep plants well watered during dry periods to promote uninterrupted growth. Corn needs 1-2 inches of rain per week for best production. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. Corn is also a heavy feeder and will benefit from side dressings of fertilizer applied as directed through the growing season.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.
  • Suckers tend to form at the base of the plants; they help support the stalks and make food for the plant. The stalks may have to be staked in windy areas, but in general they are self-supporting.
  • Sunflowers are good companion plant for corns. Direct sow sunflowers in rows parallel to corn rows to help separate corn varieties that need isolation from each other. Choose sunflower varieties of comparable height to the corn plantings. The sunflower border, with vibrant hues in russets to golden-yellow, will add sparkle next to the almost all-green corn plot. The ‘Three Sisters’ (corn, bean and squash) are traditional companion plantings with Native American gardeners.

Harvest and Preserving Tips

  • Ears of corn are ready to harvest about 17-20 days after the silks appear. The kernels should be firm. Open an ear and pierce a kernel with your fingernail. If the liquid is watery, the corn is not ripe yet. It should be milky. If it is creamy, it is overripe and will not taste as sweet.
  • Firmly grip the ear and twist downward to harvest. Take care not to break the plant when harvesting the first ear, or the second ear will not develop. Most corn produces two ears.
  • Store unhusked corn in the fridge and consume as soon as possible. Sh2 and SE varieties keep the longest in the fridge, up to one week.
  • Corn freezes well after blanching and may also be canned using a pressure cooker. Immature ears may be pickled.
Days To Maturity
61-63 days
Fruit Size
7-8 inches
Sun
Full Sun
Spread
12-18 inches
Height
48-60 inches
Sow Method
Direct Sow
Planting Time
Spring
Sow Time
After Last Frost
Thin
6 inches
Life Cycle
Annual
Corn, On Deck Hybrid is rated 2.8769 out of 5 by 195.
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I've been wanting to grow corn but I don't want the deer to eat it. I want something simple too. So I found this container patio corn. I think this is clever. It's inexpensive to put in a pot with a bag of soil and water it on daily basis! I'm quite impressed. So I put a pot in my front porch because it will get direct sunlight and it will give my front yard some decor. I think this would be great for a little fun activity for children to water and watch it grow.
Date published: 2016-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from
Date published: 2016-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from On Deck Hybrid is the Best! This is the BEST, and grows super fast, do yourself the favor of planting in the sun and also lives hot weather and consistent moisture. I planted in a barrel and the ears are forming and looking good!!!
Date published: 2016-05-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great last year - can't wait to try it again! I directly seeded outdoors (late May) using three large pots with standard potting soil. Every seed sprouted; thinned 1/2 seedlings out and gave them to my sister. We both had successful harvests. I got one full ear per stalk, a few had two. My pots were up against the house so not much wind. I did a middling job of helping with pollination so will be extra diligent this year. Tasty and sweet - my first outing with corn and we can't wait to plant it again this year. Will probably do successive planting this year as it was a lot of corn in a short time for my family of 4.
Date published: 2016-05-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Does produce very sweet corn I tried this last season. You won't get a lot of ears but if you help in the pollination part . The ears you get will be very tasty. As with all corn Pollination is the most important thing. I am reordering it again this year. We get the perfect yield for my wife and I. For best results if you can start indoors in a sun room or somewhere with warmth and sun.
Date published: 2016-03-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Corn in small space I bought these seeds last year and was glad I did. I have never planted corn in my garden because of losing valuable real estate for planting. I thought it would be fun to plant this and never expected how great the crop would be. Very sweet tasty corn produced from pots on my back patio.
Date published: 2016-02-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Hit or Miss, but Fun. Third year giving these a try. Year One, they were going great in a pot in until a wicked summer storm blew a 20 foot branch from my tree and it landed, of all places, right across the two large pots I had going. Last year, I messed up the mix (way too much compost) and they drowned when the pots failed to drain after storms. In any case, they are fun to watch and when they get to a certain size they are pretty. I look forward again this year. Really, not that expensive and a fun experiment.
Date published: 2016-02-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great sweet corn two years running! This will be our third season growing Corn On Deck. I started in 2014 with 4 containers; expanded to 6 containers last summer and this year will be planting 9 pots. I use old oak rain barrels (sawed in half) for planting. Our biggest challenge has been keeping the raccoons at bay once the ears begin to develop. :) I think the keys to growing this crop, besides proper light and water, are: 1. Make sure the potting medium has plenty of nitrogen. 2. Make sure the corn plants are close enough together. Follow the directions and plant 9-12 seeds in each container. 3. Provide support and help keep the plants connected, by following the directions and tying the mature stalks with some stakes and twine. 4. Corn is wind-pollinated. If your plants are in an area where they don't get much wind, as mine are, you can easily help the process along. When the tassles fully open and are beginning to shed pollen, gently shake the stalks in each pot. This needs to be done in dry conditions, generally in the morning. You'll actually be able to see the pollen granules drift down and sparkle on the silks of the developing corn. Do this every day for about a week. You can also break off tassles and "dust" the corn too, but I haven't needed to be that particular about it. The only thing I would say is that I've not seen each stalk produce more than 1 or at most 2 ears of corn. That may be because of my location however; due to space, they don't get as long a day of sunshine as the probably should.
Date published: 2016-02-13
  • 2016-05-27T06:04CST
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