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Carrot, Purple Dragon

Short Description

Gloriously sweet with the richest, most intense purple color.

Full Description

Slice it, shred it, love it. We love to make a cool summer carrot salad of yellow, orange and purple varieties they're delicious and a treat for the eyes. Carrot aficionados (and who isn't) will delight in this unique and tasty variety with its purple skin and light yellow core.
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Quantity
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Item#: 51016A
Order: 1 Pkt. (1000 seeds)
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$4.95
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Product properties

Days To Maturity

65-70 days

Fruit Size

6 inches

Sun

Full Sun

Spread

3 inches

Height

4-8 inches

Sow Method

Direct Sow

Planting Time

Fall, Spring

Sow Time

2-4 weeks BLF

Thin

3 inches

Life Cycle

Annual

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Our Experts Suggest

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Container Vegetables - Carrots
Growing carrots in containers is easy in early spring and again in the fall.
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How to Plant and Grow Carrots
Sweet crunchy carrots are a home-grown favorite of adults and children alike.
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  • How to Sow

    • Carrots can be sown early, after danger of heavy frost is over. Sow every two weeks thereafter for continuous harvest, or simply sow a second crop in midsummer for fall harvest. In frost free areas, sow in fall.
    • Carrots do not like to be transplanted and are best sown directly into the garden bed. Sow carrot seeds in deep, well-worked soil in full sun. Straight roots require soil that is light, loosened deeply, and free of stones, so prepare a carrot planting thoroughly. Consider using a soil amendment such as compost if your soil is heavy. If you choose long carrot varieties, your soil will need to be worked more deeply.
    • Sow thinly in rows 12 inches apart and cover with ½ inch of fine soil. Firm lightly and keep evenly moist.
    • Since seedlings have fine leaves it may be beneficial to plant radish along with your carrot seed. The radishes will be harvested well before carrots form and act as a guide to the carrot row.
    • Seedlings emerge in 14-21 days.
    • Thin carrot plants to stand 1 inch apart when seedlings are 3 inches high.

    How to Grow

    • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating.
    • Deep, consistent watering and soil well-enriched with compost help carrots form high quality roots by encouraging lush leafy tops that shade the roots, helping to prevent "green shoulders."
    • Keep plants well watered during dry periods to promote uninterrupted growth. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. It’s best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
    • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.

    Harvest and Preserving Tips

    • To make harvesting easier, soak your carrot bed with water before pulling. Twist the tops off while pulling the roots up.
    • You can leave carrots in the ground after the first frost. In cold climates, pull carrots up before the ground freezes. In warm climates, you can harvest carrots all winter.
    • Cut the greens off the top after harvest to about ¼ - ½ inches above the shoulder. This will help the carrot to keep longer as the greens can take moisture from the root.
    • Carrots store best at 32-38 degrees F at 98% humidity.
    • You can store them in the refrigerator in plastic bags, or they may be blanched and frozen for later use.
    • Carrots may be canned or pickled as well.
  • Days To Maturity
    65-70 days
    Fruit Size
    6 inches
    Sun
    Full Sun
    Spread
    3 inches
    Height
    4-8 inches
    Sow Method
    Direct Sow
    Planting Time
    Fall, Spring
    Sow Time
    2-4 weeks BLF
    Thin
    3 inches
    Life Cycle
    Annual
  • Carrot, Purple Dragon is rated 3.8333 out of 5 by 12.
    Rated 2 out of 5 by from beautiful but disappointing These were amazingly easy to grow and required no maintenance at all. They're beautiful, and the reason we chose these was for something different. My husband only eats raw carrots, but these are not good raw, they have a weird, bitter taste when they're uncooked. That doesn't stop my rabbit from loving them. They also grew rather fat and stubby here which I saw was an issue for someone else in my general area. I'm not sure if it's the area or the carrots, but I was unimpressed with their length.
    Date published: 2014-09-17
    Rated 3 out of 5 by from Kind of bitter These carrots grew nicely in my garden but they have kind of a bitter after taste to them. When they're cooked the bitter taste goes away but not so good raw for some reason.
    Date published: 2014-08-14
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Wonderful Ancient Carrot! These carrots are one of the only purple carrot seeds I can find and they are very easy to grow and are very productive. Many people think seeing purple carrots is odd but seeing orange carrots should be odd. In 3000 B.C.E., the first carrots were cultivated in present day Afghanistan. Afghanistan used to be a lush, fertile area near the Fertile Crescent. The carrots grown there, like these, were purple on the outside with a yellow, gold core. The new carrot seeds spread through the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. The Greeks and Romans cultivated carrots because they believed carrots were a very powerful aphrodisiac. Galen, a famous Roman physician, was the first person to identify carrots from parsnips. Carrot seeds spread to Asia, Africa, and other places by Arab traders. By this time, carrots had come in purple, yellow, green, red, white, and black. Orange carrots weren't bred until the sixteenth century in Holland, modern day Netherlands. They bred orange carrots to match the Dutch Royal House of Orange. By the seventeenth century, Holland was the highest producer of the first four carrot breeds they created: Early Half Long, Late Half Long, Scarlet, and Long Orange. All orange carrots we enjoy today are descendants of these four breeds. Today, you can find orange, purple, red, yellow, white, dark red, green, and rarely black carrots. In 1997, Iceland created a chocolate-flavored carrot, but it was withdrawn in just eight months. Some carrots contain an antifreeze like protein that stops ice crystals growing. This antifreeze can be used for medical use and preservative for canned food. If someone tells you that you will die from drinking antifreeze, you can say, "not necessarily." Carrots are a very good source of vitamin A which helps you prevent getting night blindness, in which the eye responds very slowly to changes in light. These carrots grew very easily for me when I directly sow them. I suggest sowing seeds on toilet paper because carrot seeds are very small and can blow away easily. Toilet paper dissolves quickly in soil and provides color contrast. Do not plant carrots in rocky soil unless you want to pull up a purple hand-shaped carrot. Carrots grow and mature surprisingly quickly so pull them up earlier than other crops. When you harvest the carrots pull from the point closest to where the leafy stems meet the carrot root or the actual carrot if it projects from the ground. When preparing carrots, chop off the leafy stems and put them in a compost or the trash. Next, cut the carrot into little "coins" about a quarter to a half inch thick. Next, put olive oil, pepper, salt, and if you want a unique taste add cinnamon into a small pan over the stove at medium. Wait till the "coins" turn a dark, gold, warm color and then serve and enjoy! These ancient carrots only take up three inches of room and grow up to 8 inches tall! If you want to grow and taste the original, 5,000 year old carrots that will appeal to your taste, sight, and appetite, you must buy these great carrots. It's nice to know that someone can continue a forgotten 5,000 year old wonder of a carrot! Good Luck! Happy Planting!;)
    Date published: 2013-01-17
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Purple Carrot Great purple color really stands out in a bunch. Taste equal to the sweet treat hybrid growing in the next row. Will grow next year. The purple color is little more than skin deep on the young carrots that I have picked. The carrots do not have a uniform shape.
    Date published: 2012-06-05
    Rated 3 out of 5 by from No grow Seeds never came up, had to replant with different seeds. Started seeds in hot house so weather was not the problem
    Date published: 2012-05-08
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Sweeter than many standard carrots I've tried four varieties of carrots so far. I found this to be sweeter than Napoli (an "early" Nantes carrot that wasn't so early), Short N' Sweet (a supposedly sweet carrot that was only ok), and one other Nantes variety. This one beat them all on flavor. And it looks fantastic to boot!
    Date published: 2010-02-05
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good first try This was the first year we had a garden and my husband just put all the seeds in a line. They were all very close to eachother so most were small. We had a few get to good size, but none of them were colored quite like in the picture. The very outside was purple colored, but once you peeled them, the color was gone. I think if they had been spaced out a bit more and left to grow a little longer they would have been the nice color shown. They had good taste and made nice snacks.
    Date published: 2009-09-04
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Grow great in dry areas. We live in a dry area, and I forget to water :). Anyway, these grow great, look great, are sweet and crisp even when the get on the large side, and didn't appear to attract any bugs or disease. My kids love the colors!
    Date published: 2009-02-15
    • 2016-02-13T06:02CST
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