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All About Cabbage

CAN I GROW CABBAGE?

Cabbage is a cool season crop - sow seeds indoors 6 weeks before your last hard frost. You can direct sow a crop for fall harvest in mid-summer.
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PLANT HISTORY

Grown even in Roman times, the cabbage of today is more compact and tasty. It's a classic ingredient in many dishes such as sauerkraut, corned beef, and even cole slaw.
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CABBAGE SEEDS OR PLANTS?

Cabbage must be started indoors 6 weeks before your last frost date. You can direct sow a crop for fall harvest in mid-summer.
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CULTIVATION

Avoid planting cabbage in the same spot each year as with any cabbage family crop.
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GROWING TIPS

Cabbage plants need up to 1 1/2 inches of water a week. Well-amended soil is vital to ensure vigorous growth.
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INSECTS & DISEASES

Cabbage is bothered by few insects and diseases. Floating row covers keep most insects at bay. Always avoid planting cabbage in the same spot each year as with any other cabbage family crop.
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HARVEST TIPS

Harvest cabbage heads when they have formed tight, firm heads. Cut the stem below the head but do not pull the remaining plant. Smaller cabbage heads often develop near the base of harvested heads.
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RECIPES & STORAGE

You can serve cabbage raw or cooked - it's great both ways! Try it steamed, boiled, stir-fried, sautéed or baked. Shred cabbage for delicious cole slaw and sauerkraut.
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See all our cabbage

Read the next Article: All About Garlic

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • Take advantage of microorganisms in the compost pile to eliminate the tedious job of removing dead, dry vines from nylon trellis netting. Instead of laboriously cutting the tangled stems off while trying to avoid cutting the netting itself, take it down—vines and all—and put it into the compost pile. Decomposing organisms will virtually clean the organic vines off the nylon mesh by spring when it can be retrieved and put back into service.