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All About Brussels Sprouts

CAN I GROW BRUSSELS SPROUTS?

Brussels sprouts are relatively easy to grow and take up little space in the garden. They must be started indoors 4 weeks before your last frost date. This is a long season crop - planted in spring for a fall harvest.
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PLANT HISTORY

Grown for centuries but popularized by Thomas Jefferson, who introduced Brussels sprouts to America in the early 1800's.
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BRUSSELS SPROUT SEEDS OR PLANTS?

Brussels sprouts must be started indoors 4 weeks before your last frost date. This is a long season crop, planted in spring for a fall harvest.
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CULTIVATION

Brussels sprouts like well nourished soils.
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BRUSSELS SPROUT GROWING TIPS

Plant the sprouts 2 feet apart in rows 3 feet apart. Provide at least an inch of water per week.
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INSECTS & DISEASES

Sometimes susceptible to the same pests and diseases as other cabbage family members - so avoid planting Brussels sprouts or any of their relatives in the same spot each year.
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BRUSSELS SPROUT HARVEST TIPS

Wait until after your first frost to begin the Brussels sprout harvest. This "frosting" improves the flavor and sweetness. To harvest, simply twist the sprouts off the stem, gathering only as many as you need at one time. The remaining sprouts will keep on the plants through part of the winter. You can even pick Brussels sprouts when there's snow on the ground.
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RECIPES & STORAGE

Brussels sprouts are tasty both raw and cooked. Steaming and boiling are the favorite of most gardeners. Sprouts keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.
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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • Several options are available to overwinter a favorite geranium. The first is to cut it back and pot it up as a houseplant for the winter to replant outside in the spring. The second is to pull it up, brush off any clinging soil, and hang it upside down in a cool, humid basement until replanting in spring. Or, you can cut 4-inch lengths of new stem and put them in water or damp vermiculite to root. Once rooted, transfer to individual pots and treat as houseplants.