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Beet, Detroit Dark Red Organic

Short Description

Dark red, extremely sweet flesh. Certified Organic.

Full Description

This classic variety produces early, very dark red and extremely sweet roots up to 3" across. It's good fresh, canned or frozen. We searched the world to find the best organic seed-Burpee fully guarantees that not a drop of synthetic chemicals was used to make these excellent seeds. Certified Organic Seed.
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Quantity
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Item#: 60197A
Order: 1 Pkt. (1000 seeds)
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$5.95
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Product properties

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

59 days

Fruit Size The average size of the fruit produced by this product.

3 inches

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

4 inches

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

8-10 inches

Sow Method This refers to whether the seed should be sown early indoors and the seedlings transplanted outside later, or if the seed should be sown directly in the garden at the recommended planting time.

Direct Sow

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Video

Container Vegetables - Beets
Growing beets in containers is easy in early spring and again in the fall.
Watch video
Growing Beets
With earthy sweetness and rich colors, beets are a delicious addition to your garden. We show you how easy it is to grow your own.
Watch video

How to Sow

  • Sow beet seeds in well-worked, well-drained soil in full sun after danger of frost in spring. In frost free areas, sow in fall.
  • Beets are sensitive to acidic soils and prefer a pH of 6.0 – 7.0. If your soil is more acidic, add Garden Lime as directed on the bag.
  • Sow thinly in rows 12 inches apart and cover with ½ inches of fine soil. Firm lightly and keep evenly moist.
  • Seedlings emerge in 14-21 days.
  • Thin to stand about 3" apart when seedlings are 1-2" tall. Note that beet seeds are actually clusters of seeds and require more thinning than other crops.

How to Grow

  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating.
  • Keep plants well watered during dry periods to promote uninterrupted growth. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. It’s best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.

Harvest and Preserving Tips

  • Pick the greens when they are 4-6 inches long and the roots are less than 2 inches in diameter.
  • Harvest roots at 1 inch for baby beets, up to 3 inches for mature beets.
  • Store fall-harvested beets at 33-35°F at 95% humidity.
  • Cook beet greens like spinach.
  • Beet roots can be pickled, grilled, baked or broiled.
  • To prevent red beets from excessive “bleeding” in cooking, wait until after cooking to peel, remove taproots and slice. Trim off the tops about 1 inch above the roots and wash carefully with a vegetable brush. Boil until tender, then plunge into cold water. When cool enough to handle, slip the skins off with your fingers and remove the little taproots. Slice the beets, or serve whole.
Days To Maturity
59 days
Fruit Size
3 inches
Sun
Full Sun
Spread
4 inches
Height
8-10 inches
Sow Method
Direct Sow
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
Sow Time
2-4 weeks BLF
Thin
4 inches
Life Cycle
Annual
Beet, Detroit Dark Red Organic is rated 4.8 out of 5 by 5.
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Can't Beat 'Em My only disappointment with these was that pests got the better of the tops so I wasn't able to harvest those for eating, too. I found myself having to cut back damaged tops quite frequently, but the plants regenerated nicely. The beets themselves were very tasty. You have the be very diligent about thinning for proper spacing but if you're reading this I'm sure that's your MO already. Likewise, be careful about the staining. Other than that, these are definitely worth a try. I'll be increasing space devoted to them next year.
Date published: 2015-10-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Nice and tasty! Threw seeds in garden April and BAM! By June I was canning. Re-planted in September for fall crop, and they did not perform for some reason. It is not October and have a total of 5-6 plants out of 30 seeds planted.
Date published: 2014-10-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from RE: Beet, Detroit Red This grows nice bulbs for fresh eating or pickling. I grew this in both a raised bed and in a traditional garden and both have done well.
Date published: 2014-09-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Delicious Detroit Dark Red has tasty greens and wonderfully sweet roots. This year my wife grew an excellent crop in a single 16" diameter container. I grew a similar size container also with excellent results. In addition to the beetroot we use the greens raw in salads and cooked--mixed in with spinach and kale and bacon. This is my favorite beet though Cylindra comes in a close second. As with everything I grow, this is an heirloom and therefore you can save seeds, though they are tiny and I recommend placing them on white paper towels so they are easier to see. Next year I'll plant more and start canning them. They are very easy to grow, but because of the tiny seeds can be hard to plant. Next year I'm taking a tip from SmartGardeners and cutting white paper towels into 1" strips, then moistening them and placing the seeds at 3" intervals. Put another moistened strip of paper towel on top, then plant the whole thing. I think that should keep my seeds from floating off and bunching together when I water. I let one of them bolt and it reseeded itself. So now, August 14, I have tiny beets coming up in the container. A bit early for a fall crop but i bet they make it. Kingman, AZ gets less than 8" rainfall per year, sits at 3500' and summertime highs are mostly above 100 with 109 or higher not uncommon. Winter lows rarely get below freezing but can drop into the high teens briefly.
Date published: 2014-08-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I planted some of these beets and they are still growing. They grow fast, and are getting big. i look forward to getting these next year.
Date published: 2013-08-12
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