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Bean, Scarlet Runner Pole

Short Description

Pretty flowers and fantastic beans all in one.

Full Description

Scarlet Runner is an ornamental and edible climber or trailer. It bears large, showy sprays of bright scarlet flowers, followed by loads of slender pods about 8" long. Young pods can be used as snap beans or can be allowed to mature for shelled fresh use or dried for winter. GARDEN HINTS: Keep beans picked for continuous bearing; shell mature pods and use as dried beans.
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Item # Product
Item#: 52696A
Order: 1 Pkt. (1.5 oz.)
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Product properties

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

70-115 days

Fruit Size The average size of the fruit produced by this product.

8 inches

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

18 inches

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

72-108 inches

Sow Method This refers to whether the seed should be sown early indoors and the seedlings transplanted outside later, or if the seed should be sown directly in the garden at the recommended planting time.

Direct Sow

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Growing Pole and Bush Beans
Beans are one of the easiest summer crops you can grow. We show you how to grow your own.
Watch video
Chef Ian Knauer Recipe-Beans with Green Goddess Herb Sauce
Chef Ian of the Farm Cooking School in Stockton New Jersey Prepares Green Beans with Green Goddness Herb Sauce.
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How to Sow

  • Because beans are members of the legume family of plants, they can benefit from an application of a soil inoculant designed for beans and peas, prior to planting. The inoculant will enable the plants to take nitrogen from the air to use as fertilizer, which can increase crop yield and quality.
  • Sow in average soil in a sunny location after danger of frost and soil has warmed, from spring to early summer. Sow after the soil has warmed, as seeds may rot in cooler soils.
  • Coat untreated seed with an inoculant.
  • Sow in rows 24 inches apart. Sow seeds 3 inches apart and cover with 2 inches of fine soil. Firm lightly and water gently.
  • Seedlings emerge in 10-14 days depending on soil and weather conditions.
  • Keep sowing bush bean seeds every 2 weeks for a constant supply of beans.
  • Thin gradually to stand 12 inches apart when seedlings are 1-2 inches high.

How to Grow

  • In dry weather, keep soil well-watered. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. It’s best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
  • Cultivate or mulch to keep weed-free, but do not work or handle plants when leaves are wet.
  • Beans as companion plants: Planted closely in rows spaced around two feet, bush bean plants blend well with like-sized warm-season vegetables such as peppers, tomatoes and eggplants. Between towers of pole bean plants, planting vines such as squash can help keep weeds down. Pole beans can help protect cool-season vegetables such as spinach and lettuces, as the weather warms.

Harvest and Preserving Tips

  • For fresh use, pick pods as soon as well-filled out with peas
  • For dried bean use, harvest in about 80 days, when the pods start to dry on the plant.
  • To Dry Beans: Allow the beans to stay on the plants until they are partially dry. Then pull up the plants and hang them in a warm, dry place with good air circulation until the pods and seeds are thoroughly dry. Shell the beans and save the pods and plants for composting.
Days To Maturity
70-115 days
Fruit Size
8 inches
Full Sun
18 inches
72-108 inches
Sow Method
Direct Sow
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
Sow Time
After Last Frost
6 inches
Life Cycle
Bean, Scarlet Runner Pole is rated 4.1 out of 5 by 10.
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not a star bean This runner bean was a good germinator, but less vigorous than other varieties of this type of pole bean that I've planted in the past. Poor producer, too. The French Emerite pole beans that I planted right next to them are still producing well, while the runner beans are just looking sad.
Date published: 2016-09-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I love this bean These bean plants climbed to at least 6 feet and produced tons of flowers within a couple months of planting. They did take a long time to produce beans after flowering, but that was okay because I used the flowers as garnishes and in salads. I used the green beans as a side dish, in salads and stir fries, and as a treat for my dogs. I also love them as a shell bean. I have cooked them as both young shell beans and as mature beans. The mature beans have a beautiful pattern even when cooked, although much of the color goes out. The taste reminds me a little of white beans, but much larger.
Date published: 2014-09-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from no fruit My beans have grown past the top of a 12 foot high net and have lots of red flowers but no fruit. Is it the weather, the deer repellent or something else?
Date published: 2013-07-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not a good climber Every pole bean I have ever grown climbs and climbs. This one hasn't climbed any more than two and a half feet. I am very very disappointed. They have excellent soil and light, there is just no excuse for poor performance.
Date published: 2012-07-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful display in my garden. I have these planted several places in my garden and they are as interesting and beautiful. The blooms themshelves are a very vibrant red and have their own stalks seperate from the main vine. They also attract bees and butterflies. I have picked a few pods that are 4-5" to use for snap beans, but I havent had a chance to cook them yet. The pods are also a little furry, so Im anxious to see what they do when I prepare them.
Date published: 2012-05-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful Flowers This is the first time my son and I have grown pole beans. I made a teepee out of eight foot poles and he planted three beans at the foot of each (4) poles. The beans grew quickly and have flowered profusely. My son would go out every morning and have me pick a bunch of flowers for the breakfast table (he's only three, so he couldn't reach the flowers.) For the last few weeks we have had extremely high temps in our area, so the flowers are scarce. But the 8 ft green teepee still looks nice. We will plant these again next year.
Date published: 2011-08-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Runner Beans I grew up in UK and my mother always grew these runner beans in our back garden. I've never been able to purchase at the supermarket since moving to US 30 years ago, so when I saw them offered at Burpee's website I jumped at the chance to grow in my American backyard. Like the previous writer in NC the runner beans are much better and more tender when the weather begins to cool, towards the end of August in Penna. I've grown these beans for 2 years now. In the height of the summer the beans were really tough and stringy and didn't produce much fruit, but once the weather cooled they were abundant. The flowers also attracted hummingbirds, always a welcome sight in the garden. I also got 2 years crops from one seed packet, just keep the left over seeds in the refridgerator until the next growing season, and don't forget to soak the beans in water before direct sowing. To cook runner beans - slice on the diagonal (French cut) and boil in salted water - yum.
Date published: 2011-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pretty and Productive The scarlet flowers are gorgeous and attracted hummingbirds to my vegetable garden. Pick them young for cooking, freezing or canning, or use the more mature pods to provide big beautiful pink beans for drying or coking fresh. I plan to grow them again this season.
Date published: 2010-04-04
  • 2016-10-22T06:16CST
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