top
Shop our new for 2015 products. Shop now!
asd

How To Grow Lavender From Seed

Lavender is one of the most popular herbs and it has been a garden favorite for many centuries. A hedge of lavender in full bloom is delightful to see and you can grow your own lavender hedge remarkably cheaply if you grow the lavender from seed.

Lavender seed has been available for several years but until recently the plants that came from one packet were variable in height and vigor. Newer lavender seed though has overcome that problem and you can now expect a consistent number of plants that look the same which is what you need for a hedge.

Lavender Lady was one of the first lavenders that came from seed easily, and it blooms well the first year. Traditional Provence and Lacy Frill, a pretty white lavender, also come from seed and unless you only want one or two plants, growing them all from seed is a great way to fill your perennial bed with fragrant lavender.

Start the seed early and place the seed tray on a heat mat or in a warm location so that your seeds germinate well. Rather than a traditional potting mix, use a very light mix or fine vermiculite that drains very quickly. The seedlings will germinate in about two weeks and will take a while to look like lavender. Make sure that the seedlings get sufficient water, but do not let them stay damp, and place them in full sunlight for maximum health.

When your little lavenders have several sets of leaves on them, put them into their final location, but check them regularly to make sure they have not been knocked over by animals, or dislodged by rain. Once the lavenders are settled in the ground they will grow slowly the first year, but most of them will bloom, and by next year you will have a splendid supply of lavender to plant into a hedge or use as a border for your perennial bed.

Read the next Article: 10 Excellent Summer Bulbs

Personalize Your Site:

Enter your zip code to:

  • Find your growing zone.
  • See best products for your region.
  • Show accurate product shipping dates.
Go
Clear my Zip Code

Gardening Tip of the Day

  • To reduce spring yard chores, and minimize pest and disease problems next season, make one last yard cleanup. Rake up dead bark, rotting plants, tall weeds, sticks and other debris that can harbor pest insect eggs, pathogens, or rodents. After the ground freezes, spread a 3-inch winter mulch over any bare soil in beds and around trees and shrubs.