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Hydrangea, Nikko Blue

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Short Description

Classic blue.

Full Description

6" mop head-type flowers bloom in July-August. Azure blue color is deeper in acid soils; in alkaline soils, flowers are pink. Shrubs add substance to perennial beds and are ideal companions for large trees. Full or partial sun.
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Quantity
Price
Item#: 22421
Order: 1 Plant
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$19.95
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Product properties

Zone

5-9

Sun

Full Sun

Height

6 feet

Spread

6 feet

Bloom Season

Fall

Resistant To

Rabbit

Ornamental Use

Borders, Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers

Planting Time

Fall, Spring

Genus

Hydrangea

Life Cycle

Perennial

Plant Shipping Information

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Restrictions:

Item 22421 cannot ship to: AA, AE, AK, AP, AS, CN, FM, GU, HI, MH, MP, PR, PW, VI See all Burpee plant shipping restrictions for your state

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Video

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Perennials return year after year blooming on their own. Watch this introduction and discover how easy and rewarding growing perennials can be.
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Take a garden tour and see favorite perennial plants in a garden setting. In this video- Shasta Daisy, Ornamental Grass, Butterfly Bush, Echinacea and Hydrangea.
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  • Hydrangea is planted as a potted plant.

    Planting Potted Plants in the Garden:

    • Hydrangeas may be planted in partial shade or in full sun. In the south shade is better for them. In the north full sun is better. Some varieties are more tolerant of sun than others. Select a location with soil rich in organic matter. Avoid planting too close to trees which will compete with them for moisture.
    • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 6-12, inches removing any debris, and lightly raking as level as possible.
    • The addition of organic matter (leaf mold, compost, well-rotted manure) benefits all gardens and is essential in recently constructed neighborhoods.
    • Plant on a cloudy day or in late afternoon to reduce transplant shock.
    • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball.
    • Unpot the plant and gently loosen the root ball with your hands to encourage good root growth.
    • Place the top of the root ball even with the level of the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand.
    • Use the plant tag as a location marker.
    • Thoroughly water and apply a light mulch layer on top of the soil (1-2 inches) to conserve water
    • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their germination. 
    • Mulches also help retain soil moisture and maintain even soil temperatures. For perennials, an organic mulch of aged bark or shredded leaves lends a natural look to the bed and will improve the soil as it breaks down in time.  Always keep mulches off a plant’s stems to prevent possible rot.
    • Careful watering is essential in getting perennials off to a good start. Water thoroughly at least once a week to help new roots grow down deeply. Soil should be damp at about 1 inch below the soil surface. You can check this by sticking your finger in the soil. Water early in the morning to give all leaves enough time to dry.  One inch of rain or watering per week is recommended for most perennial plants. You can check to see if you need to add water by using a rain gauge.
    • After new growth appears, a light fertilizer may be applied. Keep granular fertilizers away from the plant crown and foliage to avoid burn injury. Use low rates of a slow release fertilizer such as Garden-tone, as higher rates may encourage root rots.
    • “Deadhead”, remove spent flower heads just below the inflorescence (the cluster of flowers) to encourage continuous flowering and prevent seed development. The flowers of some varieties dry nicely on the plant.
    • In colder regions, apply another layer of mulch (1-2 inches) after the ground freezes in fall. Evergreen boughs (from Christmas trees) provide additional protection. Remove this mulch in the spring.

    Hydrangeas make beautiful cut flowers and add a nice touch to borders. Many varieties are also great for containers.

    Pruning is very important and will vary depending on the species of the plant:

    Hydrangea quercifolia (Oak Leaf Hydrangea) bloom on last year’s wood, only prune any pruning that needs to be done is just to control height. Prune right after it is finished blooming or just remove the dead flowers.

    Hydrangea macrophylla (Big Leaf Hydrangea): This species blooms on last year’s wood. Any pruning that needs to be done is just to control height. Prune right after it is finished blooming or just remove the dead flowers.

    Hydrangea serrata ( Mountain Hydrangea): This blooms on last year’s wood. Prune right after it has finished blooming or just remove the dead flowers.

    Hydrangea paniculata (Peegee Hydrangea): This blooms on this year’s wood. Prune in early spring before new growth starts.  For the largest flowers, thin to 5-10 primary shoots. Note that the weight of the flowers can cause the branches to arch downward.

    Hydrangea arborescens (Hills of Snow Hydrangea): This blooms on this year’s wood. Prune in early spring before new growth starts. Hills of Snow hydrangea may be left unpruned (except for removing dead branches). In this case it will produce many smaller clusters of flowers.  

  • Zone
    5-9
    Sun
    Full Sun
    Height
    6 feet
    Spread
    6 feet
    Bloom Season
    Fall
    Resistant To
    Rabbit
    Ornamental Use
    Borders, Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers
    Planting Time
    Fall, Spring
    Genus
    Hydrangea
    Life Cycle
    Perennial
  • Hydrangea, Nikko Blue is rated 2.625 out of 5 by 8.
    Rated 1 out of 5 by from horrible This plant arrived and did well for the first week but after a couple of weeks no matter HOW much we watered it the stupid plant died .
    Date published: 2015-04-05
    Rated 1 out of 5 by from Disapointed They were one stemmed plants thats took forever to look healthy. I would not buy these again. Went to my local store and they had ones for the same price and had beautiful blooms. They haven't bloomed yet. They are only now about 1 foot in diameter. I have to water these 3 x a day just so they won't wilt.
    Date published: 2014-07-14
    Rated 2 out of 5 by from Hydrangeas Small I ordered three of the Nikko Blue Hydrangeas. They were supposed to be 1-2 years old, but they were small little stalks. One died immediately, while the other two look okay. I would not purchase these from Burpee again. My local stores have a much better selection for the same price. They also took a while to come in.
    Date published: 2014-06-09
    Rated 1 out of 5 by from LITTLE DEAD PLANT The rating should be a ZERO, but the required minimum is 1. I ordered three plants for my mom for mothers day, this being one of them. They arrived little, dried out, and dead. They were not protected as the vegetable plants were. I was expected a decent sized thriving plant, not some puny dried up piece of trash. This is unacceptable. I sent an email requesting a refund for my order.
    Date published: 2014-05-27
    Rated 1 out of 5 by from Suprised by poor quality I was so looking forward to these flowers but I was sorely disappointed when they arrived. I purchased two of these Hydrangeas, two Hostas and a tulip blend bag of 15 bulbs. The live plants all looked sick and dying. I had such high hopes because of all the great reviews, but I will not be buying from Burpee again.
    Date published: 2013-10-25
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from beautiful hydrangeas my hydrangeas are at least 10 years old my now. Come back every year...all that I do is in the late fall cut back the old dried out stems and old flowers. I do not cover them during the winter...they are extremely hardy in the New England winters. I have 2 plants and are going to get a few more. My hydrangeas are the easiest plants in my garden. Very, very low mantainance.
    Date published: 2012-07-08
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hydrangea, Nikko Blue Beautiful stunning blue that is most outstanding even in corners of garden. It's a focal point among green foliage. Hardy and resistant to diseases. Easy to maintain. My 3 plants in pot are 10 years old. I have since propagated 3 more.
    Date published: 2011-02-15
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from VERY NICE ! They did soooo well for me this year , especially here in the middle of Massachusetts ... This was their first winter , and they can through really well.. I covered them with some cheap plastic trash cans, weighed down with bricks and they came throught the winter beautifully ... I didn't even have to treat the soil - the blooms were a GREAT sky blue ...
    Date published: 2006-08-06
    • 2016-02-05T06:12CST
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