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Chamomile, German

Short Description

Use small white daisies in potpourris, tea and hair rinses.

Full Description

Use in brewing tea, making perfumes or hair rinses. Start early indoors or outdoors after danger of frost.
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Item#: 51409A
Order: 1 Pkt. (1200 seeds)
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$4.95
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Product properties

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

60-90 days

Life Cycle This refers to whether a plant is an annual, biennial or perennial. Annuals complete their life cycles in one year; biennials produce foliage the first year and bloom and go to seed the second year; perennials can live for more than two years.

Annual

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

24-36 inches

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

12-14 inches

Additional Uses Additional ways in which the product may be used in the garden.

Fragrant

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Chamomile may be grown from seed sown early indoors and transplanted outside after frost, or planted as a potted plant.

Sowing Seed Indoors:

  • Sow chamomile seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before outdoor planting date in spring using a seed starting kit
  • Sow seeds ¼  inch deep in seed starting formula
  • Keep the soil moist at 70 degrees F
  • Seedlings will emerge in 14-21 days
  • As soon as the seedlings emerge, provide plenty of light on a sunny windowsill, or grow seedlings 3-4 inches beneath fluorescent plant lights turned on 16 hours per day, off for 8 hours at night. Raise the lights as the plants grow taller. Incandescent bulbs will not work for this process because they will get too hot. Most plants require a dark period to grow, do not leave lights on for 24 hours.
  • Seedlings do not need much fertilizer, feed when they are 3-4 weeks old using a starter solution (half strength of a complete indoor houseplant food) according to manufacturer’s directions.
  • If you are growing in small cells, you may need to transplant the seedlings to 3 or 4 inch pots when seedlings have at least 2 pairs of true leaves before transplanting to the garden so they have enough room to develop strong roots
  • Before planting in the garden, seedling plants need to be “hardened off”. Accustom young plants to outdoor conditions by moving them to a sheltered place outside for a week. Be sure to protect them from wind and hot sun at first. If frost threatens at night, cover or bring containers indoors, then take them out again in the morning.  This hardening off process toughens the plant’s cell structure and reduces transplant shock and scalding.

Sowing Directly in the Garden:

  • Roman chamomile can be planted after the danger of the average last harvest date. German chamomile can be directly sown after all danger of frost has passed.
  • Direct sow in average but well drained soil in full sun at the recommended planting time.
  • Remove weeds and work organic matter into the top 6-8 inches of soil; then level and smooth.
  • Sow seeds evenly and cover with ¼ inches of fine soil.
  • Firm the soil lightly and keep evenly moist.
  • Seedlings will emerge in 14-21 days.
  • If direct sown, thin to 12 inches apart when seedlings have at least two sets of leaves.

Planting in the Garden:

  • Select a location in full sun where water drains quickly after a rainfall.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball. 
  • Carefully remove the plant from its pot and gently loosen the root ball, if tight, with your hands to encourage good root development. 
  • Place the top of the root ball even with the level of the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand leaving a slight depression around the plant to hold water. 
  • Use the plant tag as a location marker. 
  • Water thoroughly, so that a puddle forms in the saucer you have created. This settles the plants in, drives out air pockets and results in good root-to-soil contact.
  • Chamomile may also be grown in containers. Make sure the potting mix is light and well drained. Use a mix for succulent plants, or add perlite to improve drainage. 
  • Do not allow plants to dry out, but never let the soil stay wet.  A clay pot is recommended as it drains well.
  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating. 
  • Mulches also help retain soil moisture and maintain even soil temperatures. For herbs, an organic mulch of aged bark or shredded leaves lends a natural look to the bed and will improve the soil as it breaks down in time.  Always keep mulches off a plant's stems to prevent possible rot.
  • Keep plants well-watered during the growing season, especially during dry spells. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. Use a rain gauge to check to see if you need to add water. It's best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
  • German chamomile tends to reseed readily if the flowers are allowed to remain on the plant. Roman chamomile will form a groundcover.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.

  • Harvest when flower petals are no longer flat but arch backwards.
  • Harvest the flowers, remove leaves and stems, and allow them to dry. Spread on a cheesecloth or a window screen in a dry, shady location.
  • When thoroughly dry, store in a tightly sealed glass jar in a dry, dark location, such as a cupboard. 
  • Flowers may be used to make tea.
  • German chamomile may be used for perfumes and hair rinses.
Sun
Full Sun
Days To Maturity
60-90 days
Life Cycle
Annual
Height
24-36 inches
Spread
12-14 inches
Additional Uses
Fragrant
Sow Method
Direct Sow/Indoor Sow
Planting Time
Spring, Summer
Thin
12 inches
Chamomile, German is rated 4.6667 out of 5 by 3.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great medicinal qualities Vigorous plant that is lovely in my herb garden and flowers for almost two months. Has fern like leaves. I dry the flowers and store them for winter. I have a spastic colon and this tea stops it from cramping. All these years I suffered and a simple God made flower has given me complete relief. A friend said she takes this tea before bedtime and she sleeps better. videos on this on you tube. Your own flowers work better than store bought teas.
Date published: 2016-03-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderfully invasive When I was growing these indoors under plant lights for the first time, I lost track of which ones they were so I thought my chamomile was unsuccessful. However, when I transplanted little ferny seedlings in spring they grew into big flowery chamomile plants. They are great dried and made into tea. Plus, they smell wonderful. I like to plant them with Chinese Forget-me-nots because the yellow, white and blue look so nice together. A warning though - this combination seems to attract a lot of bumblebees. This is great for pollination, though. The flowers should be cut and harvested often because if you leave them on the plant for too long, the plant will stop producing for the season. However, if you want it to spread, leave some flowers to dry on the plant and the wind will carry the seeds. You will probably even see new plants in the same season. These plants are wonderfully invasive! The seeds survive in the ground in 0-5 degree F winter temperatures. Come the following spring, every single pot in my yard was full of little ferny chamomile sprouts. I even had 2-foot high chamomile plants growing out of the cracks in the concrete! (and a couple in my neighbor's yard) It is now the 3rd spring since I first cultivated them and they're back again. The only work I have to do to grow them now is weed out the extras or I wouldn't be able to grow any other herb. This season, they started sprouting as early as late February and early March despite winter temperatures. The frost hasn't killed them but they grow pretty slow when it's that cold. Nevertheless, I wouldn't recommend sowing seeds from a packet that early because they aren't cold-conditioned. Start them indoors under lights or direct sow after the last frost. Then just let the plant take it from there.
Date published: 2011-03-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from good product with tricky planting I planted the seeds at about the same time that I planted my Borage, which was mid June. It took forever for them to sprout and only a few did. One plant flowered out of the entire packet. However, it's a very nice plant, and for next year, I would start these ahead of time with my tomatoes. From that, I'm certain that it would be worth it.
Date published: 2008-08-09
  • 2016-05-04T06:40CST
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