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Rosemary

Short Description

Fragrant leaves flavor meats, poultry and potatoes.

Full Description

Rosemary is an essential ingredient for holiday turkeys, but it adds wonderful flavor to meats, other poultry and vegetables too. It also makes a good addition to potpourris. Start seed early indoors. Plants tolerate light frost; set outside early. Perennial. Zones 7-10.
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Item#: 61382A
Order: 1 Pkt. (100 seeds)
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$3.95
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Item#: 24522
Order: 3 Plants
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$14.95
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Product properties

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

90-400 days

Life Cycle This refers to whether a plant is an annual, biennial or perennial. Annuals complete their life cycles in one year; biennials produce foliage the first year and bloom and go to seed the second year; perennials can live for more than two years.

Perennial

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

24-36 inches

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

12-24 inches

Sow Method This refers to whether the seed should be sown early indoors and the seedlings transplanted outside later, or if the seed should be sown directly in the garden at the recommended planting time.

Indoor Sow

Plant Shipping Information

Plants ship in Fall at proper planting time (click for schedule)

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Item 24522 cannot ship to: AA, AE, AK, AP, AS, CN, FM, GU, HI, MH, MP, PR, PW, VI
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Rosemary may be grown from seed sown early indoors and transplanted outside after frost, or planted as a potted plant.

Sowing Seed Indoors:

  • Sow rosemary seeds indoors 10 weeks before outdoor planting date in spring using a seed starting kit
  • Sow seeds ¼  inch deep in seed starting formula
  • Keep the soil moist at 70 degrees F
  • Seedlings will emerge in 14-21 days
  • As soon as the seedlings emerge, provide plenty of light on a sunny windowsill, or grow seedlings 3-4 inches beneath fluorescent plant lights turned on 16 hours per day, off for 8 hours at night. Raise the lights as the plants grow taller. Incandescent bulbs will not work for this process because they will get too hot. Most plants require a dark period to grow, do not leave lights on for 24 hours.
  • Seedlings do not need much fertilizer, feed when they are 3-4 weeks old using a starter solution (half strength of a complete indoor houseplant food) according to manufacturer’s directions.
  • If you are growing in small cells, you may need to transplant the seedlings to 3 or 4 inch pots when seedlings have at least 2 pairs of true leaves before transplanting to the garden so they have enough room to develop strong roots
  • Before planting in the garden, seedling plants need to be “hardened off”. Accustom young plants to outdoor conditions by moving them to a sheltered place outside for a week. Be sure to protect them from wind and hot sun at first. If frost threatens at night, cover or bring containers indoors, then take them out again in the morning. This hardening off process toughens the plant’s cell structure and reduces transplant shock and scalding.

Planting in the Garden:

  • Select a location in full sun where water drains quickly after a rainfall.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball. 
  • Carefully remove the plant from its pot and gently loosen the root ball with your hands to encourage good root development. 
  • Place the top of the root ball even with the level of the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand leaving a slight depression around the plant to hold water. 
  • Use the plant tag as a location marker. 
  • Water thoroughly, so that a puddle forms in the saucer you have created. This settles the plants in, drives out air pockets and results in good root-to-soil contact.
  • Rosemary may also be grown in containers. Make sure the potting mix is light and well drained. Use a mix for succulent plants, or add perlite to improve drainage. 
  • Do not allow plants to dry out, but never let the soil stay wet. A clay pot is recommended as it drains well.
  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating. 
  • Mulches also help retain soil moisture and maintain even soil temperatures. For herbs, an organic mulch of aged bark or shredded leaves lends a natural look to the bed and will improve the soil as it breaks down in time.  Always keep mulches off a plant's stems to prevent possible rot.
  • Keep plants well-watered during the growing season, especially during dry spells. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. It's best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated. Rosemary is particularly susceptible to root rot, avoid overwatering, and make sure the soil drains well. Rosemary does benefit from misting in dry conditions.
  • Rosemary requires little care, but can benefit from occasional pruning. Pinch the stems to encourage bushiness or remove the branches to attain a desired shape.
  • Silver foliaged herbs prefer poor, well-drained soils and little fertilization.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.
  • Rosemary is marginally hardy in zone 7 and many gardeners bring their plants inside during the winter.
  • Clip leaves or stem tips as needed. Rosemary may be used dry or fresh.
  • If you are using rosemary fresh, pick it early in the morning for highest oil content. 
  • For drying or freezing, harvest leaves that have their maximum oil content, just before flowering.
  • Harvest leaves, tips and flowers. Chop or crumble leaves before using.
  • To dry, cut whole stems on a dry morning. Tie stems loosely together in small bunches and hang in a dry, airy location out of the sun. Rosemary may also be dried on a cheesecloth or a window screen in a dry, shady location. Do not use heat to dry rosemary as the fragrant oils can be volatile. When thoroughly dry, store in a tightly sealed glass jar in a dry, dark location.
  • Rosemary may also be frozen dry or in an ice cube tray in water or olive oil.
Sun
Full Sun
Days To Maturity
90-400 days
Life Cycle
Perennial
Height
24-36 inches
Spread
12-24 inches
Sow Method
Indoor Sow
Planting Time
Fall, Spring
Thin
18 inches
Rosemary is rated 3.6666666666666665 out of 5 by 12.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful! I loved the packaging! They arrived in perfect condition. The scent is delightful when you crush them. I can't wait to use them.
Date published: 2015-05-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wow...actually grew rosemary Wow! I was really surprised to actually grow rosemary from seed. Rosemary is notorious for not growing well from seed, but is planted these in pellets (I planted a number in each pellet) hoping at least a few would germinate. In the end, I think every single seed sprouted. I planted them in a pot so I could bring it in for the cold winters...they are still going strong!
Date published: 2014-01-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Rosemary I purchased the rosemary plant then put it into a little bit bigger pot had it outside in from of the apartment I lived in. It was in full afternoon sun next to the building so I needed to water it a lot. I then brought it in during the winter and put it out last summer in a bigger pot and again brought in last winter and I now have it outside in a pot at the house I live in now. Its great herb and I always have fresh rosemary to cook with.
Date published: 2013-05-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Rosemary Seeds Absolutely a waist of time. 20 out of 100 sprouted and the Seeds are not cheap neither. Hoping the Company will make good on this Batch. The little Plants look like they will not make it very long. Sorry for disappointing News to you.
Date published: 2013-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The King of Herbs I purchased this type of rosemary at a local garden store as a plant not a seed. Some herbs like rosemary, fennel, stevia, and lavender can be difficult to sow and germinate so it's best for a more inexperienced gardener to buy a plant rather than waste money on seeds that won't grow. If you do choose to sow the seeds i suggest sow into seed pellets and transplant when it gets pretty warm outside. Water the pellets generously. Move them outside when the seedlings are about 2-3 inches high. You can either plant them in a 6-8 inch pot or 7 inches apart in a garden or long pot. It takes some time for the plant to mature depending on the weather conditions. These plants are not very tolerant of constant cool weather especially seedlings. They are a warm season crop and require full sun. They are native to southern areas. Water less frequently, only when the plant gives off a yellow color. Under favorable conditions the plant will bush and grow up to 2 feet high. Some have reached 3 feet. During early to mid July the plant will grow small purple flowers resembling lilac. The flowers, stems, and pointed leaves are all edible. Put it on meats, steak, pork, chicken, turkey, etc. to give it a appealing herbal taste. When harvesting start with the smaller stems on the side of the plant. If you pick a main centered stems it could disfigure and affect plant growth. Again I suggest you buy plants instead of the seeds because herbs like rosemary, stevia, fennel, and bananas (yes, bananas are the largest herb species) are difficult and hard to germinate. When it gets cooler outside, transform it to a house plant by putting it inside near a sunny window. It is perennial where there are warmer temperatures in burpee's zones 7,8,9, and 10. I highly recommend and will have again since I live in zone 7. Happy Planting! Good Luck!;)
Date published: 2012-11-25
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Total watse Not a single one sprouted. The other seeds great, sage, thyme, green onions, parsley, peppers, etc .... everything came up in min. time but the rose mary, not a single one made it. Other herbs in the smae bed doing fine.
Date published: 2012-05-09
Rated 1 out of 5 by from horrific germination! i bought a pack of this rosemary, late spring early summer i planted it, kept it safe from rempaging kids, dry spells, storms, all the perils of Mi weather during that time of the year as my basil and cilantro started comming up, my rosemary container was completely void of life. i figured it was just a slower grower and kept on taking care of it w/ my other herbs. in short the only thing to EVER grow in that pot was a little weed. i'm pretty sure i'll be buying a prestarted plant ( and goodnees i hate those) next year
Date published: 2011-08-01
Rated 2 out of 5 by from very cold sensitive I had a lot of difficulty growing this plant from seed. It was difficult to germinate and got really stringy under the plant lights. It ended up not being viable for transplanting. I ended up buying an already started plant which did well. I wintered it over indoors but I put it outside too early and it died overnight. For the zone 6 people who managed to winter their plant outside, I imagine these plants were in the ground and not in pots. In order to grow these successfully indoors, I think you will need a heat mat and a large grow light so that the plant can be always directly under the light.
Date published: 2011-03-28
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