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Chives, Garlic

Short Description

Flavor is midway between garlic and onion.

Full Description

The flat, tender leaves have a flavor midway between garlic and onion. Delicious in salads, spreads and flavored vinegars. Perennial in Zones 3-10. Start early indoors or outdoors after danger of frost.
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Item#: 51383A
Order: 1 Pkt. (300 seeds)
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$3.95
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Item#: 24549
Order: 3 Plants
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$16.95
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Product properties

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Days To Maturity The average number of days from when the plant is actively growing in the garden to the expected time of harvest.

80-90 days

Life Cycle This refers to whether a plant is an annual, biennial or perennial. Annuals complete their life cycles in one year; biennials produce foliage the first year and bloom and go to seed the second year; perennials can live for more than two years.

Perennial

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

18-24 inches

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

3-4 inches

Additional Uses Additional ways in which the product may be used in the garden.

Container Plant

Plant Shipping Information

Plants ship in Spring in proper planting time (click for schedule)

Restrictions:

Item 24549 cannot ship to: AA, AE, AK, AP, AS, CA, CN, FM, GA, GU, HI, ID, MH, MP, PR, PW, VI, WA
See all Burpee plant shipping restrictions for your state

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Chives may be grown from seed sown early indoors and transplanted outside after frost or sown directly in the garden.

Sowing Seed Indoors:

  • Sow chives seeds indoors 8-10 weeks before the average last frost date in spring using a seed starting kit.
  • Sow seeds ¼  inch deep in seed starting formula
  • Keep the soil moist at 70 degrees F
  • Seedlings will emerge in 7-14 days
  • As soon as the seedlings emerge, provide plenty of light on a sunny windowsill, or grow seedlings 3-4 inches beneath fluorescent plant lights turned on 16 hours per day, off for 8 hours at night. Raise the lights as the plants grow taller. Incandescent bulbs will not work for this process because they will get too hot. Most plants require a dark period to grow, do not leave lights on for 24 hours.
  • Seedlings do not need much fertilizer, feed when they are 3-4 weeks old using a starter solution (half strength of a complete indoor houseplant food) according to manufacturer’s directions.
  • Before planting in the garden, seedling plants need to be “hardened off”. Accustom young plants to outdoor conditions by moving them to a sheltered place outside for a week. Be sure to protect them from wind and hot sun at first. If frost threatens at night, cover or bring containers indoors, then take them out again in the morning.  This hardening off process toughens the plant’s cell structure and reduces transplant shock and scalding.

Sowing Directly in the Garden:

  • Direct sow in average soil in full sun after all danger of frost. In frost free areas sow from fall to early spring.
  • Remove weeds and work organic matter into the top 6-8 inches of soil; then level and smooth. 
  • Sow seeds evenly and cover with ¼ inches of fine soil. 
  • Firm the soil lightly and keep evenly moist. 
  • Seedlings will emerge in 7-14 days.
  • Thin to 3 inches apart when seedlings are 1-2 inches tall.

Planting in the Garden:

  • Select a location in full sun where water drains quickly after a rainfall.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball. 
  • Carefully remove the plant from its pot and gently loosen the root ball, if tight, with your hands to encourage good root development. 
  • Place the top of the root ball even with the level of the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand leaving a slight depression around the plant to hold water. 
  • Use the plant tag as a location marker. 
  • Water thoroughly, so that a puddle forms in the saucer you have created. This settles the plants in, drives out air pockets and results in good root-to-soil contact.
  • Do not allow plants to dry out, but never let the soil stay wet. 

Direct Sow:

  • Sow outdoors in spring after the average last frost date.
  • Sow in average soil in full sun.
  • Sow seeds thinly and cover with ¼ inch of fine soil.
  • Firm lightly and keep evenly moist.
  • Seedlings emerge7-14 days.
  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients, so control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating. 
  • Mulches also help retain soil moisture and maintain even soil temperatures. For herbs, an organic mulch of aged bark or shredded leaves lends a natural look to the bed and will improve the soil as it breaks down in time.  Always keep mulches off a plant's stems to prevent possible rot.
  • Keep plants well-watered during the growing season, especially during dry spells. Plants need about 1 inch of rain per week during the growing season. It's best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated. 
  • Cut leaves to the ground after blooming to encourage the production of fresh new leaves.
  • For garlic chives, pinch off spent flowers in fall to prevent rampant self-sowing.
  • Divide clumps every 3 to 4 years to keep them vigorous.
  • Monitor for pests and diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.
  • Harvest the leaves by clipping them back to 1 inch above the ground; new leaves will emerge.
  • Add fresh leaves to salads, soups, cream cheese, butter, or sandwiches.
  • Sprinkle the florets on salads.
  • The leaves and flowers also make flavorful vinegars. Try adding the pink-lavender blooms to white vinegar—they will give it a light onion flavor and a beautiful pink color.
  • After garlic chives plants flower, the attractive seed heads may be harvested and used in herbal wreaths and arrangements.
  • Include garlic chives in perennial borders, herb gardens, vegetable and containers, indoors and out.
Sun
Full Sun
Days To Maturity
80-90 days
Life Cycle
Perennial
Height
18-24 inches
Spread
3-4 inches
Additional Uses
Container Plant
Sow Method
Direct Sow/Indoor Sow
Planting Time
Fall, Spring
Thin
3 inches
Chives, Garlic is rated 4.4286 out of 5 by 7.
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Terrible Seeds Did not sprout at all. Looking forward to these, and even used burpees ultimate growing system, but only ONE seed sprouted. Very disappointed. All of my other seeds sprouted just fine.
Date published: 2012-05-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Just Perfect This is a very easy-to-grow herb that had a germination of about 95% this year. I'm looking forward to having a nice clump every year. It is perfect when I don't have any fresh garlic or onion on hand for raw fried potatoes. It's also faster to snip than to clean and chop onion and garlic. Flowers are great in salads when you want a hint of flavor.
Date published: 2009-08-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from OVERALL WINNER I PLANTED CHIVES IN 2 GALLON POTS, 5 GALLON BUCKETS, AND IN SANDY SOILS. ALL WERE ALLOWED TO REACH THEIR MATURITY, (FLOWER STAGE) BEFORE CUTTING BACK ON ANY BUNCHES. YOU CAN'T HARM THEM IF YOU TRIED. THEY LOVE THE FLORIDA WEATHER. WATERING CAN BE 'HIT OR MISS' AND THE SPROUTING NEVER STOPS. THE KIDS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD KNOCK ON MY DOOR TO ASK IF THEY CAN PICK A FEW LEAVES TO CHEW ON, THEN I 'CUT & BAG' SOME MORE FOR MY OWN RELATIVES. PULLED OR CUT APART, THE ROOT SYSTEM WILL NOT STOP AND YOU CAN HAVE AS MANY MINI-POTTED 'PRESENTS' AS YOU WANT TO GIVE AWAY FOR THE HOLIDAYS. GREAT KID STARTER. DID I FORGET TO MENTION? YUM YUM ON ANY SALAD OR DULL DISH.....
Date published: 2009-08-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Delicious and beautiful Although they taste wonderful, consider this herb also for the flowers. Late in summer pale green shoots rise and you get a cluster of beautiful white flowers. Against a dark green background they look like stars. I get tons of compliments from neighbors who can't believe garlic looks so good! I have some in the back for eating, and some in the front yard for looking. :)
Date published: 2008-10-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pleasantly Surprised I have just started harvesting the chives. I wanted to wait until I thought the plants could handle mild harvesting. The taste was very surprising. Very strong garlic and chive flavor, but without any onion like burn. I really love this plant. I have not had a chance to try the flowers yet. They are great cooked or raw.
Date published: 2008-10-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Chives Thrive in Miami! No Care! I've been growing Burpee Garlic Chives from seed in Miami, FL for years. Same planting! I HIGHLY recommend these to other busy, working, or part-time gardeners in my zone. They are extremely robust - almost indestructible,even in a container. Freely flower and reseed. They do not mind drought, lack of feeding, hurricanes, and other neglect. You can always cut and come again. Very nice mild garlic flavor. We like to cut and chop right before dinner, and sprinkle on baked potatoes. A staple in my herb container garden.
Date published: 2007-01-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Garlic chives i have had no problem with growing or separating when they need to be spread out as they become root bound. i like to leave them potted to use as needed. they wintered very well even at freezing temps( which i don't recommend but i forget they were out there.)The taste is very good on baked pototoes and spag. sauce.
Date published: 2006-06-12
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