top

Your Regional Garden News - Zone 7

June 1 to June 30

 

Discover what you should be doing right now.  Our experts share gardening advice, techniques, news, and ideas to make your garden the best ever.  

Here's what's happening in your gardening region:

 

  •  

    Learn about growing delicious tomatoes

    Summer is bearing down and it’s starting to get hot. That means warm weather vegetables like tomatoes are growing, flourishing, and fruiting. Lots of growth, lots of heat, and (hopefully) lots of rain and humidity mean lots of problems for tomatoes. Learn how to spot common tomato diseases and what to do about those. Learn how to care for tomato plants and when to harvest during extreme heat, and if you are space-challenged, get tips for growing great tomato plants in containers.

  •  
  •  
  •  

    Plant some perennials!

    Now that your cool-weather annuals are out of the garden and the rest of the landscape beds have started to fill in, you’ve probably noticed some holes here and there. Or, possibly, you removed a shrub or two and you have more room in the garden. That makes it the perfect time to plant perennials! Sure, you’ll have to keep an extra eye on watering if there are hot temperatures and no rain, but plants planted now will have a chance to establish themselves well before winter. Digiplexis is the “it” plant this year, and it is truly gorgeous. Gaura is a “perennial” favorite (pun intended), but Rosy Jane® is an interesting bi-colored variety. Joe Pye Weed is excellent for wildlife gardens, perennial borders, and landscape beds. Blooming in late summer, it provides necessary food for late season bees and butterflies.

  •  
  •  

    Grow an heirloom garden.

    Heirloom plants are varieties that have been growing and blooming, unchanged, for fifty years or more. There are always new varieties on the market, but heirlooms have stood the test of time—because of spectacular flowers, delicious taste, robust growing habits, and more. Burpee has a wide selection of heirloom flowers and vegetables. It isn’t too late to get these old-fashioned favorites growing in the flower garden. And don’t forget to check out the vegetable selections!

  •  
  •  

    Learn to cook with summer vegetables.

    When you harvest a summer bounty, what do you do with it? If you’re looking for some new recipes we have several to inspire you. Put dinner on the table for your family with George’s Secret Tomato Sauce Recipe. Nothing beats the juicy, flavorful taste of homemade salsa, so get ready to chop up what’s left after the sauce for a summer picnic. And, quite frankly, there are never enough ways to use up a prolific zucchini or summer squash harvest, so we threw in another recipe for those, too.

     
  •  

    What you need to protect plants from pests.

    There are several ways to protect your plants from pests but they generally fall into two categories: barriers to prevent pest damage before it happens and eradication methods. Barriers come in two forms: fencing or covers to keep pests away and repellents and sprays that make plants taste unpleasant to pests after they get a nibble. The Small Animal Barrier is good for keeping small munching mammals away from the garden. Hot Pepper Wax is also a barrier solution, but a pest has to take a bite before it works because you spray the wax on the plant. Insecticidal Soap will kill pests once they have infested your plants. This pesticide works best on soft bodied insects such as aphids.

  •  
  •  
    •  

Personalize Your Site:

Enter your zip code to:

  • Find your growing zone.
  • See best products for your region.
  • Show accurate product shipping dates.
Go
Clear my Zip Code

Gardening Tip of the Day

  • "In areas of the country where the salt content of tap water is high, it can accumulate to damage container plants over time. The solution is to water with rainwater.
    Burpee's Rain Saver collects 60 gallons of screened water from gutter downspouts. This not only provides high quality water for potted plants, it helps conserve water. If you think your plants may already have too much salt in the soil, try filling the pot several times with rainwater to leach out any salts that may have accumulated."