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All about Swiss Chard
Easy to grow from seed and produces a long-lasting crop. Read article
Win the Race for the First Ripe Tomato
Tips for winning the race! Read article
Dog-Friendly Gardening
Dog-friendly landscaping keeps everybody happy. Read article
Elderberries
Jams, jellies, and elderberry pie. Read article
Rutabaga
Rooting for rutabagas. Read article
Pomegranate
As decorative as they are delicious. Read article
Fall Raspberries
Patience pays off when you plant fall-bearing raspberries. Read article
Asian Greens
These gourmet favorites are easy to grow in the cool of spring and fall. In this video we cover Pak Choi, Chinese Cabbage, Mizuna and Tatsio. Watch Video

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • There’s nothing like going into the garden in the middle of December to pull large, luscious parsnips for your holiday dinner. Wash and gently scrub the roots, then briefly steam them to make paring easier. With larger roots, remove the woody core and use only the tender outer flesh.

    To retain the parsnip's delightful, sweet flavor, don’t boil them as the sugar in the roots dissolves in water. Many people ruin the taste of parsnips by cooking them until they’re mushy and bland. The best way to prepare parsnips is to brown the slices in butter or sauté them in a little oil, keeping the heat low to lock in the flavors and avoid scorching the sugar in the flesh. Or simply bake them. If you want a simple side dish for Christmas dinner, steam parsnip slices with fresh peas until tender and serve drenched in melted butter. It’s so delicious, it’s almost decadent!