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All About Watermelons

Every gardener should plant a hill or two of watermelons as they are easy to grow and, oh so good on sultry summer afternoons.

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All About Potatoes

Potatoes are thickened underground stems called tubers. For good tuber development, potatoes require deep, loose, well-drained soil that is free from stones.

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All About Zinnias

Zinnias are undemanding annuals that simply need full sun, warmth, and well-drained soil rich in organic matter.

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All About Squash

Summer squash does everything but plant itself! If you're looking for a vegetable that's easy to grow and produces huge yields, you can't beat summer squash.

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All About Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi prefers rich, well-drained soil in full sun. You can plant this cool-season crop for a spring for a spring or fall harvest in the North, or for a winter harvest in the South.

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All About Leeks

Leeks prefer deep, rich soil in full sun. Start seeds 10 to 12 weeks before the last frost in spring.

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All About Lettuce

Gardeners can select from a large variety of lettuces that are easy to grow, highly productive in limited space, and virtually pest and disease free.

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All About Onions

Onions fit into three categories: short-day, intermediate-day and long-day varieties. Gardeners in plant hardiness Zone 7 and south will succeed best with short-day onion varieties. 

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • There’s nothing like going into the garden in the middle of December to pull large, luscious parsnips for your holiday dinner. Wash and gently scrub the roots, then briefly steam them to make paring easier. With larger roots, remove the woody core and use only the tender outer flesh.

    To retain the parsnip's delightful, sweet flavor, don’t boil them as the sugar in the roots dissolves in water. Many people ruin the taste of parsnips by cooking them until they’re mushy and bland. The best way to prepare parsnips is to brown the slices in butter or sauté them in a little oil, keeping the heat low to lock in the flavors and avoid scorching the sugar in the flesh. Or simply bake them. If you want a simple side dish for Christmas dinner, steam parsnip slices with fresh peas until tender and serve drenched in melted butter. It’s so delicious, it’s almost decadent!