The Great American Seed Starting Day is observed each year on the first Saturday of April.  This date is important to gardeners all across the United States no matter their location because in warmer climates this is about the time gardeners are sowing direct sow vegetables and in cooler climes this represents the time to get indoor sown seeds started.

 

 

Why sow seeds? Sowing seeds gives you the opportunity to choose from hundreds if not thousands of different varieties- just about any color, flavor, size, and shape you could hope for.

How to Sow?

Direct Sow Seeds can be planted directly in loose, well-drained garden soil. No indoor seed-starting, no lights, no transplanting.

Click here to read article on Direct Sowing Seeds.

Click here to view video on how to Direct Sow Seeds.

Indoor Sow Seeds require starting the seeds indoors in winter, early spring, or early fall to get a head start on a too-short growing season. Seeds are planted in small containers, in loose well-drained potting soil, and grown under lights or on a windowsill for an average of 8 weeks before the last spring frost. Plants are then moved outdoors when the air and the soil are warm enough.

 

Click here to read article on Indoor Seed Starting.

Click here to view video on Indoor Seed Starting Part 1.

Click here to view video on Indoor Seed Starting Part 2.

Click here to view video on Indoor Seed Starting Part 3.

 

 

Cool Season Crops

Warm Season Crops  

Direct Sow

Lettuce

Spinach

Radish

Peas

Beans

Corn

Cucumbers 

Indoor Sow

Kale

Broccoli

Cabbage

Tomato

Pepper

Eggplant

Herbs

When to sow?

Cool Season: Early Spring & Late Summer Planting

Direct Sow 3-6 weeks before frost-free or first frost date.

Sow Indoors 8-10 weeks before frost-free or first frost date and transplant outdoors about 2-4 weeks before frost-free or first frost date.


Warm Season: Late Spring & Early Summer Planting

Direct Sow around frost-free date and up to 4-8 weeks after.

Sow Indoors 6-8 weeks before frost-free or first frost date and transplant outdoors around frost-free date and up to 2-4 weeks after.

Tips to Success:

  1. Start with Good Quality Seed Starting that is light fluffy material that retains moisture
  2. Good quality, fresh seed is a “must-have” for healthy plants. By starting with fresh seed you have a great chance of getting the lush green plants you can make your neighbors envy.
  3. Water!  Find your groove and stick with a watering routine. Ensure seedlings are kept moist and well-watered as they are establishing. Don’t let the soil dry out!
  4. Let the Light Shine - Seedlings without enough light can start to look spindly and sick. At least 6-8 but up to 10-12 hours of direct sunlight is important for edible crops at all stages of growth, indoors and outdoors.
  5. Toughen-up your plants! This means slowly transitioning your plants from indoors to the outdoors.  Over the course of 7-10 days set plants out in the morning shade for a few hours working up to a full day and eventually full sun for a full day, finishing with leaving them outside at night for 1-2 nights prior to transplanting.