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I was given a lot of "Chrome" seeds. When is the best time to plant? Can I start them in seed cells now? It's in the 30's here. Thanks!

Asked by: Mellie
I'm sorry, but I have never heard of "Chrome" as a form of plant with seeds. (Chrome is a shiny metal element that is used to coat automobile bumpers and the like.) Please further clarify and maybe I could help you better. Good luck
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-06

Can yellow squash be grown on a trellis like cucumbers?

Asked by: EdOSU
Possibly, but I have never tried doing this, myself. Yellow squash lacks the tendrils that reach out and grab and hold onto things like cucumbers have. So you will likely need to gently tie the plant stems to your trellis yourself, I believe. Good luck.
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-06

MY peach trees and pear trees have been slowly dying back slowly for years. I now starting to loose trees. I have friezing and treated for several treatments. What should I look at?

Asked by: DWSWF
Southwest Florida is zone 10, I believe. Peaches and pears do best when they can get at least 6-10 weeks of winter chill time in order to do well, which is generally not possible in zone 10. You can't really do much to change the weather where you are. I believe I personally would plant an orange tree or other citrus in the location of every dead or dying peach and pear tree location. I am sorry that I cannot help any further.
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-06

2 years ago I bought some asparagus and some bare root raspberry plant.  The raspberries only 2 of 5 plants sprouted and they were attacked by bugs.  The asparagus did well the first year, but the second year only half reprinted, and they don’t look good 

Asked by: Bryant
I see you are attempting to grow these plants in zone 10. As I was taught, these plants need some winter chill time in order to do well. Maybe you could keep them in your refrigerator for ~2 months each winter? Or switch to growing bananas or citrus or something similar. Good luck.
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-06

Can direct sow seeds, such as Sunflower, be started indoors then transplanted?

Asked by: cheri23
Yes, certainly. Gardeners in the UK will often start corn/maize seeds and other warm season plants in small peat pots indoors for later transplanting outdoors. Good luck
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-06

Any advice on prevention of tomatoe blight (they're grown outdoors, not in a greenhouse and garlic rust?

Asked by: Raven54
"Tomato blight" is a rather nonspecific term, so all I can do is give you some general advice, perhaps. First of all, tomatoes are native to the leeward semi-arid slopes of the Andes Mountains of South America, and as such, they should be thought of as desert adapted plants. They therefore also enjoy lots of heat and sunlight, within reason. Also, as desert-type plants, they really like to send their roots down deep, and they do not like excessive watering, which generally will promote diseases. If you have a "tomato blight" problem, I recommend digging your tomato beds down deeply, as deep as 2 feet, if possible. Then add generous organic matter to the backfill, along with some crushed limestone to prevent blossom-end-rot disease. Definitely plant only disease resistant varieties, such as Celebrity, and not Big Boy, which is devoid of disease resistance. And do not grow tomatoes or other solanaceae in the same ground more often than every third year, to prevent diseases from building up in your soil. (Solanaceae=tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, tomatillos, petunias, eggplant, tobacco, etc.) In a place like England, there should be no need for any sort of watering on your part, and your natural rainfall may even be too much for them. A good mulch around your plants will provide the "even moisture, but not too much" that tomatoes enjoy. Don't they grow tomatoes exclusively in hothouses in England? Good luck
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-06

best way to speed up decomposition of mulched leaves?

Asked by: Rich1949
Adding some high nitrogen lawn type fertilizer will help a lot, (or some cotton seed meal or manure if you wish to remain organic) and keeping them constantly turned or fluffed up so that they can get plentiful Oxygen is best. But don't let them dry out, but instead remain evenly moist at all times. Good luck
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2017-12-31

I mixed potting soil and dirt 50/50 last year in my garden. Can I use the same dirt this year. My cubs didn't do very well.

Asked by: Dddd
Yes, you can use this dirt over and over, year after year. But many vegetables, such as tomatoes, are best not grown in the same dirt year after year due to the buildup of possible diseases. Tomatoes can be grown ideally in the same dirt only every third year. Good luck.
Answered by: hessianguy2
Date published: 2018-01-05
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