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Blackberry, Triple Crown

Buy Any 3 Fruit or Berry Plants & Save 20%

Short Description

Thornless plants produce sweet blackberries over 5 weeks.

Full Description

These large, juicy-sweet, blue-black berries grow abundantly for five of your summer's sweetest weeks. Enjoy the firm, nutritious berries as a snack or instant dessert; and they're superb in a pie, mousse or sorbet. The thornless blackberry plants are upright, orderly and easy to maintain. Growing 4-8', the plants form a sturdy hedge with the canes supporting pounds of fruit without a trellis.
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Item#: 19933
Order: 5 Bare Root Plants
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$34.95
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Product properties

Zone This refers to the USDA hardiness zone assigned to each part of the country, based on the minimum winter temperature that a region typically experiences. Hardiness zone ranges are provided for all perennial plants and you should always choose plants that fall within your range.

5-8

Sun The amount of sunlight this product needs daily in order to perform well in the garden. Full sun means 6 hours of direct sun per day; partial sun means 2-4 hours of direct sun per day; shade means little or no direct sun.

Full Sun

Height The typical height of this product at maturity.

48-96 inches

Spread The width of the plant at maturity.

24-36 inches

Life Cycle This refers to whether a plant is an annual, biennial or perennial. Annuals complete their life cycles in one year; biennials produce foliage the first year and bloom and go to seed the second year; perennials can live for more than two years.

Perennial

Growth Habit The genetic tendency of a plant to grow in a certain shape, such as vining or bush like.

Erect

Plant Shipping Information

Plants begin shipping week of:

Mar 27, 2017

(Click here for Spring shipping schedule)

Restrictions:

Item 19933 cannot ship to: AA, AE, AK, AP, AS, CN, FM, GU, HI, MH, MP, PR, PW, VI
See all Burpee plant shipping restrictions for your state

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Fall Planted Fruits
Fall is an ideal time to plant fruit plants. Plants will establish strong root systems and get a jump on spring growth.
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  • Blackberries may be planted as bare root or potted plants.
  • Choose a well-drained, sunny location with no standing water. Prepare the soil before planting by mixing compost or other organic matter in with the soil. Work the soil deeply.
  • Space canes 3 feet apart in rows 6 feet apart. Dig each hole to twice the size of the root mass.
  • Plant blackberries 100 feet away from red raspberries.

Planting Bare Root Plants:

  • Before planting, trim very long or broken roots.
  • Cut back top growth to 6 inches.
  • Set roots 1-2 inches deeper than formerly grown.
  • Back fill with loose soil. Gently press soil in around the root ball. Transplants need good root-to-soil contact. Do not press too hard because that can cause soil compaction and root damage.
  • Gently water around the root ball to settle the soil and drive out air pockets.
  • After planting be sure to mark the plants with plant labels so you know where they are and what varieties they are.
  • Mulch with 2-3 inches of compost of pine needles to retain moisture and prohibit weed growth.

Planting Potted Plants:

  • Set the plant in the hole at the same depth as it was growing in the pot.
  • Backfill the hole and press firmly around the base of the planting.
  • Water deeply. The water will seal off any air pockets around the root ball.
  • After planting be sure to mark the plants with plant labels so you know where they are and what varieties they are. 
  • Mulch with 2-3 inches of compost of pine needles to retain moisture and prohibit weed growth.
  • Keep weeds under control during the growing season. Weeds compete with plants for water, space and nutrients. Control them by either cultivating often or use a mulch to prevent their seeds from germinating.
  • Add mulch each year as needed.
  • Keep plants well-watered during the growing season, especially during dry spells. Plants need about 1-2 inches of rain per week during the growing season. It's best to water with a drip or trickle system that delivers water at low pressure at the soil level. If you water with overhead sprinklers, water early in the day so the foliage has time to dry off before evening, to minimize disease problems. Keep the soil moist but not saturated.
  • In the spring, before leaves sprout, apply a granular fertilizer following the instructions on the label. Most new growth will come from the plant’s crown under the soil. Plants use a lot of energy in spring when growth begins, so do not let plants dry out.
  • Remove all wild brambles near cultivated varieties to prevent virus diseases.
  • Each year cut to the ground all but 5 or 6 of the most vigorous canes of each plant about 6 inches apart to improve fruit production. Prune these to about 30 inches to encourage lateral branches. They will bear fruit the following year, and should be cut to the ground after harvest.
  • Repeat these steps each year:
    • Select the most vigorous canes
    • Cut them back to 30 inches
    • Prune back the previous year’s laterals
    • Remove canes after laterals have borne fruit
  • NOTE: For Primocane Bearing Blackberries: These bear fruit twice on the same cane. Prune new shoots each year as for standard blackberries. New shoots bear fruit at the tips in fall, and further down on the cane the following spring. Cut back old canes after the second crop is harvested.
  • Remove and destroy old canes immediately; rake up and remove fallen leaves and fruit to help prevent fungus diseases. Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service for pest controls recommended for your area.
  • Blackberries may not need support when they are properly pruned. To prevent wind damage and to make harvesting easier, canes may be individually tied to two parallel wires strung between posts at either end of the row. 
  • Fruiting season is in summer: July, August or September. Fruit will not continue to ripen after picking so be sure to wait until fruit is ripe before picking. The fruit will ripen from red to black, but do not pick them as soon as they turn black, wait 3-4 days and pick when the color has a dull appearance. These will be the sweetest fruit. Pick in the morning or evening, when temperatures are coolest.
  • Expect to harvest at least twice a week for several weeks.
  • Fruit damages easily so handle with care. Store in a shallow container in the fridge as soon as possible after picking.
  • Wash blackberries and allow them to dry on a clean paper towel for 10-20 minutes before storing.
  • Fresh blackberries last a day or so, but can be frozen or used for preserves.
Zone
5-8
Sun
Full Sun
Height
48-96 inches
Spread
24-36 inches
Life Cycle
Perennial
Growth Habit
Erect
Food Use
Edible Fruit, Sauce
Genus
Rubus
Ornamental Use
Beds, Borders
Planting Time
Fall, Spring
Blackberry, Triple Crown is rated 4.0 out of 5 by 10.
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not upright as advertised, trellis required. Description is false. This is a ground vine variety, requiring trellis. I'm guessing that's why only berry images are shown, not plant. Slow growing/starting. 20% of bareroot plants failed to grow at all.
Date published: 2016-06-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I bought 5 plants bare root plants last year at this time. The produced lot of sweet berries in the first year. I have then on a trellis and it works fairly well. They made great jam. I also planted raspberries and they also turned out great.
Date published: 2016-03-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I like this Blackberry I like this Blackberry this is become my favorate blackberry planted two in pots and even in pots competeing with the birds I got 2 cups off of one plant. next year I'll have a cage and put them in the garden blackberry raised bed I figure it will be the next year that I'll get a bumper crop do to transplanting but as hearty as they seem to be might just get another heavy crop.
Date published: 2015-10-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic yield! I planted these last year in my first experience with fruit and bare root plants. My family snickered a bit when I set out these "sticks" in the garden. I put in 5 plants in a row along a fence. This year the canes are easily 10 feet long in my poor clay soil. They will need to be trellised as they just get too long to support themselves (unless you prune them, I guess). The yield has been tremendous: about 1-2 pints of large berries per day from 5 plants. Plants propagate when the canes touch the ground and develop roots - very easy but needs to be managed (another good reason for a trellis). I highly recommend these. Easy to grow, no thorns, great size and flavor. I pick them when I get home from work to put in my daughter's lunch for the following day.
Date published: 2015-07-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from very healthy I planted this in spring this year and wanted to know if I have to stake or trellis these plants? the canes are growing 5-6 ft long on the ground.I thought this plant was an upright. This is my first time growing blackberries.I appreciate the help thanks:)
Date published: 2014-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Bountiful Berries I planted these and the first year was overrun with berries. So many that I actually canned them with peaches. The flavor was amazing and my family loved the peach berry crisp in the middle of winter. Very prolific and sweet too.
Date published: 2014-09-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Prolific I got this along with some raspberry plants and this one has taken off. It was small when it came in the mail, but took quickly to the growing conditions. I have to say that I didn't baby this cane at all. It grew and spread throughout the growing season and provided great fruit on a daily basis. This grows and spreads quickly, so keep that in mind when you plant it or want to propagate another cane with new growth. Love this blackberry plant.
Date published: 2014-01-17
Rated 1 out of 5 by from received puny half dead plant Sept 14th 2012 I am shocked at the poor quality of the plant I received from Burpee. The plant is half dead with two puny mostly brown leaves. It was not even packed in a nursery pot of any size, rather it was chucked in a plastic bag smaller than a sandwich bag with very little soil. It's not likely to survive the week let alone put down enough roots to get through the winter. I have ordered from Burpee so many times before and have always received good plants so I cannot believe they would send such a poor quality plant. I am very disappointed.
Date published: 2012-09-15
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