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Honeyberries Gardening Guide

How to Plant Honeyberries

Upon arrival, check containers for moisture, if not moist to the touch, add water and allow the containers to drain. If you are not ready to plant, keep plants in a semi-shaded and protected area. Do try and plant as soon as possible, the sooner in the ground, the sooner roots will be made. Until planting, keep the soil moist to the touch; do not allow the containers to dry out.

When planting, dig the hole at least 11/2 to 2 times the size of the container. Planting height is important, attempt to set the plant in the hole at the exact depth of the soil in the pot, it’s better to be a 1/2 high, than a 1/2 low. When you back-fill the hole, if your soil is good, use that soil, but if you feel your soil can be improved, back-fill with a good organic soil or compost. If your soil tends to dry out, you can add a little peat moss, if your soil is moist, a little sand can be added.

Caring for Honeyberries

Honeyberries are very easy to grow, hardy and adaptable, they will form a nice small shrub in the range of 5-6' tall and a 4' spread. Soil ph is very widespread from 5 to nearly 8, with 6.5 perfect. Plants will produce fruit at a very young age, full production by year 3. Honeyberries, because of their strong growth habit are heavy feeders. They need to be fed twice annually, early spring and after fruiting with a well balanced 10–10–10 fertilizer. Pollination is achieved by insects moving pollen from flower to flower. Rooting is not deep, pay attention to moisture, as soil dries out on surface, plants will need to be watered. Prune after fruiting is over to encourage new growth, which will be the fruit producing wood next season.

Read the next Article: Hardy Kiwi Gardening Guide

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • Potting healthy plants in dirty containers invites disease pathogens. Scrub used pots inside and outside with a soft brush using a solution of mild dish washing detergent and warm water. Place small plastic pots on the top shelf of the dishwasher for an even more thorough cleaning. Remove the crusty residues from fertilizer salts by wetting them with vinegar and scrubbing with a stiff brush.

    To clean stained and moldy terra-cotta pots simply soak them in a solution of 1 part household bleach to 9 parts water for a few minutes. Air-dry and rinse in clean water.
    To clean pots containing plants, cover the plant with a paper or plastic bag. Spray the bleach solution on outer pot surfaces rather than dipping it. Allow to dry and then rinse. Scrub stubborn spots gently with a vegetable brush while rinsing.