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Burpee’s Mammoth Mums

Chrysanthemums (Mums) are the showcase of every fall garden. Over the last 10 years there has been a decline of mums planted in the garden. Gardeners are buying potted mums and using them as potted plants as a component in a fall display with bales of hay, dried corn stalks and pumpkins. Display mums are not necessarily good garden performers.

The Mammoth mums are exceptional garden performers. Once planted, they will bloom dependably for many years; they will be the fall display in your garden. The difference in the Mammoth Mums from others are that they are huge, growing 2-3’ high with a spread of at least 4’. Mammoth Mums are very hardy. They grow well as far north as zone 3, but grow extremely well in the south. Many mums require pinching, they go into flower too early, but not the Mammoth Mums. They grow very compact and tight, with hundreds of stunning, colorful flowers per plant.

Mums are perfect in the perennial garden or used as background plants in your annual garden. As your annuals begin to decline, the Mammoth Mums begin their fall and early winter show. Planting mums in the fall was a technique used by gardeners of past, and it’s a grand tradition that needs to be continued for the overall improvement in your garden.

Read the next Article: Tulips: Take a Tip from Nature

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Gardening Tip of the Day

  • Professional plant people are recommending the use of more native plants in residential landscapes. Because they are well adapted to the conditions in their region, natives are typically more self-reliant than plants introduced from elsewhere. Tough and attractive, they require very little care. Some examples are: New England aster, bee balm, coralbells, black-eyed Susan, butterfly weed, goldenrod, purple coneflower, joe-pye weed, and Virginia creeper.