<![CDATA[Burpee Community - ]]> http://www.burpee.com/community/discussion/464/artichokes en-US Burpee //d1l316k04n1hna.cloudfront.net/static/images/burpee-favicon.png 16 16 Burpee http://www.burpee.com/community/ <![CDATA[Re: artichokes]]> http://www.burpee.com/community/discussion/464/artichokes?commentid=165 Cut the plants back late fall next year’s growth comes from the bottom, leave about 12 inches. In zones 8 through 10 Artichokes should need no winter protection. In zones 6 through 7 cover the crown completely  with several inches of straw or leaves before the first freeze.  Remove the mulch when the temperatures rise in the spring, but re-cover if a late freeze is forecast. If you have a lot of freezing weather many people invert a box or basket over each plant for added protection.  Generally the first year is the most critical for Artichokes,

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http://www.burpee.com/community/discussion/464/artichokes?commentid=165 September 24, 2012
January 20, 2013 January 20, 2013 <![CDATA[Re: artichokes]]> http://www.burpee.com/community/discussion/464/artichokes?commentid=1606 I don't know if you would be interested in an Artichoke variety that will produce the artichoke in the same season. I found one called Imperial Star through Gurneys. I live in zone 4 in Montana and have a short growing season but I still got qute a few and they were very tasty. The maturity time is 150 days, I started my plants inside to give them a head start. At the end of the season I dug a few of my plants and brought them indoors as I had let some of them flower and wanted to save the seeds. I agree the flowers are quite beautiful and last for a long time. I am going to start my seeds even earlier this year, like the end of Feb. so my transplants will be bigger, they transplant real well.   Happy growing,   Tracy

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http://www.burpee.com/community/discussion/464/artichokes?commentid=1606 January 20, 2013