BurpeeGuestAcco

BurpeeGuestAcco

Vegetable garden in part shade

A good part of my vegetable garden is in part shade.  I have been rotating where I plant over the past few years to determine where is the best place for each vegetable.  Typically I put in tomatoes, cukes, squash, pumpkin, zucchini, broccoli, brussel sprouts, peppers.  Any advice on which of these--or other veggies, I'm open to try new things--would be best to place in the shadiest part of the garden and which need to go in the sunniest?  Typically I reserve that for the tomatoes.  Thanks!

Views: 3960 Replies: 2 Date: 2012-02-23T12:18:32.000Z
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burpee

Re: Vegetable garden in part shade

 

Any of the salad greens should do well in  part shade, like lettuce and spinach. Also because it is a little cooler the plants grow longer in the summer.

2012-02-24T08:43:09.000Z

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  maggievanfossan

maggievanfossan

Re: Vegetable garden in part shade


Your spring and Fall vegetables will probably tolerate shade more. Your tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, corn, beans all need sun and warmth. You may be able to tuck some of your sun-loving summer vegetables into your flower beds where sunlight is more plentiful. Last year I planted my spring salad veggies in my shadier area and moved my tomatoes, peppers and eggplants into containers on my front porch. They benefit from the warmth of the concrete. They were beautiful plants, and I enjoyed walking by them several times a day. I know people who plant their warm-needing vegetables in pots and putting them in a wagon. They can pull them around as the sun moves to get maximum sunlight. Remember plants in containers need frequent watering and fertilizing.

I have added grow bags to my planting containers. Mine are large, heavy plastic bags with drainage holes cut in the bottom. They are black inside to hold heat, white on the outside. They last 2-3 seasons and cost about $1 each plus shipping. There are many online sources. Last year I had 3 large crops of potatoes in my bags. You roll them down, plant your potatoes, and as they grow you add soil and roll them up. I was stunned by my results. They're also pretty easy to move with some help if you absolutely have to. 

 

2012-03-22T14:20:33.000Z

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