momforrest Soil Stomper

momforrest

Strawberry plants, can I move mine?

The raised planter that contains my strawberry plants is in need of a lot of repair this spring.  Am I OK to move my plants to a new planter without risk of them dying.  They are two year old plants.  We live in Wisconsin.

Views: 10573 Replies: 5 Date: 2012-02-10T07:37:24.000Z
Result Count: 5
 
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  PA-Gardner

PA-Gardner

Re: Strawberry plants, can I move mine?

Hi Momforrest!

Well, if the planter needs repair, then it needs repair!  You likely can't do it with the strawberries in place, or at least not all of them.  since individual plants usually are said to have a useful life of 3 years, you only have about 1 more year of life in them anyway.  So, this is my thoughts...I'd wait until this year's harvest is done, assuming they are June bearers.  Then I'd pull out the plants and put a few in a plot of rich humus soil that I'd prepared earlier, as a holding pen.  I'd plant them like they were new plants, and clip back the  leaves so only 1 or 2 tiny ones were remaining once moved.  Keep the plants moist but not wet, so they don't mold, and make sure there is air movement without crowding.  Now, while you are fixing the raised bed over a couple weeks, (well, it would take ME that long, anyway), the plants will be sending out their new leaves and then their new runners for new plants up until fall.  Once cooler fall temps arrive, start moving some of those new baby plants over into the repaired raised strawberry bed to start getting settled in.  You may have some that don't make it, but I've transplanted strawberry plants in the fall 3 or 4 times, (one time it was snowing!) but the majority of them have always survived.  Books will tell you to pinch off all the blooms that first Spring, to better establish the plants and get bigger yields--but I haven't always followed that advice.  :0   I'd leave the "mother" plants that were in the holding pen until after next year's harvest, as it is likely some of them will still be able to produce, but maybe not as much as last year, but you will still get some, and they can be supplemented by a few (or more) from your new planting until they get more productive their 2nd year in the raised bed.  Books will also tell you to not try raising your own berry plants, as you may be spreading disease, or a higher likelihood of it, but among my Amish neighbors, they are ALWAYS digging up some of their plants to start new beds or give to someone (like me) starting a new bed, and they don't seem to have any problems, but after 4-5 yrs, maybe more, they might start a new large bed in an entirely new place and buy dozens or 100's of plants, depending if they are berries for sale.

Actually, I'm expecting to follow this very advice, moving some of my berries from an area that I learned could become quite wet (last year), though they did well a bit later, to have some in an area that is drier and on a slope for better sun and drainage.  That way, maybe I'll still have berries come wet or dry years!

Good luck!

2012-02-10T19:42:12.000Z

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  momforrest Soil Stomper

momforrest

Re: Strawberry plants, can I move mine?

Thank you so much!  I feel better prepared for the upcoming move!

2012-02-14T12:46:54.000Z

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  momforrest Soil Stomper

momforrest

Re: Strawberry plants, can I move mine?

Thank you so much!  I feel better prepared for the upcoming move!  BTW, it will take ME weeks to fix the raised bed as well Laughing

2012-02-14T12:48:12.000Z

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  Soil Stomper

NewYorkMillet

Re: Strawberry plants, can I move mine?

I followed PA's advice and moved one of my strawberry plants a couple of weeks ago. They seem to be doing OK.

Does anyone have any tips for moving blueberries?

2012-08-06T14:24:20.000Z

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  Garden Guru

burpee

Re: Strawberry plants, can I move mine?

 

The best time to move your blueberries is the early spring, if you can’t move in the spring wait until the fall  when it is cool and bush begins to go dormant, avoid the hot summer. Choose a spot that gets full sun. Prepare the new bed first mix a lot of organic matter in the new bed, remember blueberries need a pH of 5.0 to 5.5 so test your soil first.  Make sure you dig a wide hole since roots are shallow and spread.

Carefully dig up the bush with as big a root ball as possible, place the ball on a tarp or burlap to transport. Make sure the hole is no deeper than the root ball plant and gently back fill the hole and water. Continue to water the bush if it gets dry until the ground freezes.

It is normal for some die back, so don't worry.

2012-08-08T05:45:14.000Z

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